Nadal Defeats Disappointing Djokovic in Rome Final to Become French Open Favorite

Well that didn’t quite pan out the way I hoped. The final got postponed to today due to rain last night, but the rain did in fact clear up and then for some reason Djokovic and Nadal decided they did not want to play. Djokovic went down a break early on but broke back and then started looking like the dominant one. He kept putting pressure on the Nadal serve while holding serve easily himself. He could not take advantage of his break point opportunities however. With Nadal serving at 4-5 and 30-30 there was controversy where Djokovic hit a shot that looked like it would be a winner but the lines person called it out. It ended up being in and they had to replay the point. This seemed like a turning point but in truth Djokovic had a forehand earlier in the point he should have put away.

This was his problem the whole match. He could not finish points off when it needed to be finished off. This is something I picked up on already in the US Open final last year. Djokovic allows Nadal to hang in points for longer than he should because he does not put away the short ball or go to the net when he should. It became more apparent in the Australian Open final this year where Nadal came very close to winning the match. That should have been a wake-up call for Djokovic, but I didn’t notice anything different in Monte Carlo or today. On hard courts it’s easier to get away with it, but on clay Nadal will make him pay. He will keep running down everything and frustrate you. Djokovic just lacks the variation. He doesn’t hit enough angles, drops shots, or go to the net often enough.

He should be more decisive when the opportunity presents itself to win the point. Or maybe it’s just the fact that he isn’t on the level he was last year anymore. Either way he needed to be more decisive. Nadal then went on to break Djokovic in the next game and held serve to win the first set 7-5. Nadal also broke in the opening game of the second set. Djokovic needed to hit back right away. He got up 40-0 on the Nadal serve but couldn’t take advantage of his break points. Again he lacked the killer instinct to get it done. Nadal had won five games on the trot and that turned out to be decisive. Djokovic could not even make Nadal serve for the match as he double faulted on match point at 3-5. Watching this match was frustrating.

The clay season is a done deal. Nadal will win his 7th French Open title, unless a miracle happens. The only way he was not going to win it is if Djokovic beat him in Rome. Now I can’t see anyone stopping him. I’m not looking forward to the French Open and I don’t mind the possibility that I will miss it due to going to the US. Nadal will moonball, push, and grind his way to a 7th French open title. Nothing new to see there. Roger is #3 again and I can’t see him avoiding Nadal now. He will either meet him in the semis or in the final if he beats Djokovic. It will be hard to defend his final points from last year now. He could beat Djokovic again given that Djokovic is not the player he was last year, but that would mean another final with Nadal.

Basically I just want the clay season to be over. It’s by far the least interesting part of the tennis season. Just hand Nadal the French Open title already. We know he is the clay GOAT!

Highlights:

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38 Comments

  1. Hey Ru-an!

    After sleeping, I realized that the situation is not at all as bad as it seems.
    Realistically, each of the top three believes they can win, and they all have reasons for that.
    Djokovic won the Australian Open and Miami.
    Rafa won Monte Carlo, Barcelona and Rome.
    Roger won Rotterdam, Dubai, Indian Wells and Madrid.
    All three are playing great at certain times, and then not so good at other times. I feel that it’s gonna come down to the luck of the draw and who lasts mentally the longest.
    There is no absolute favourite. No one is dominating at all times. I think it’s going to be very exciting for tennis fans!!!
    Hopefully Roger will be the luckiest and pull ahead in this three man race!
    He has shown us that anything is possible and today’s result is not going to change that at all!!!
    Allez Roger!!!

    PS. I agree with you that Nadal is the absolute favourite for Paris but stranger things have happened. Let’s see the draw on Friday! :-) ))

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  2. Rafa’s definitely the favourite, but you just never know what will happen. He could run into a really hot player like in 2009 and get blown off the court. I think it will be interesting this year because Rafa has been sharp and Fed has been great the whole year and Novak will want to get the 4th in a row. Somehow I see Nole going out before the semis which would make life easier for Roger. We shall see.

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    Vily Reply:

    Roger That!!! I agree with you! You just never know!!!

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  3. Totally disagree with you Ru-an. Nadal looked as vulnerable as he’s ever done. Yes, Djoker had issues killing the ball but his game getting there was better than what we’ve seen this season (AO excluded though). My impression is that he is on his way back. Just didn’t get there in time for Rome. In three weeks time he will be.
    Nadal has only one big advantage and this is that his intellect does not interfere with his game. Roger and Djoker are articulate and intelligent people. Nadal, forgive me for saying so, is ….. a kid. That why his game is not to fun to watch, although what he does he does very well.
    Speaking about the game. Maybe I haven’t watched enough matches but aren’t we seeing more serve-and-volley on clay that we are used to? Maybe its just me but it could be what the more gifted players try to do to break Nadals stranglehold on clay. Seems strange, however, Nadal seems very prone to slice the ball back high. More so than before even. People seem to attack his backhand much more than before and though he returns everything, quite a few of them seem to be ballooning back when pushed with a decent approach shot while he is bouncing back and forth between the doubles courts. This may be a crack in the armour that the simplicity of this games gives him. I actually wouldn’t rule our Federer to beat him in Paris if he gets his head in order.
    No, Paris might be worth watching.

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  4. I didn’t expect Nadal to own Djokovic in today’s final, but I also didn’t expect Federer to be off in his semi with Djokovic two days earlier. I think we all should have hope for Roger! Remember, this is tennis, and anything can happen! Rafa was out early in 2009, and Roger took it all the way home because of it! Isner pushed Rafa in the early rounds of last year’s French, and he also has beaten Federer and Tsonga on clay this year, so either of the top 3 meeting with Isner should watch out! Hopefully Federer gets the lucky half of the draw and just proves his good form is here to stay :-)

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  5. very gloomy post, Ruan… hope you’d feel better soon! try to stay positive – what else can we do?

    i think it’s time for Fed to get his grip togather and beat Rafa in RG, and reclaim this title. i really want him to take this one – as i said before – if it was up to me i would trade it with Wimby. hell i would sign a deal with the devil if that what it takes !!

    yes RN is the overwhelming favorite but there are some who can bother him.
    group 1 : ppl who can take him out on a very good day – Djoko, Fed, Delpo
    group 2: ppl who can take him out with devine intervantion – Berdych, Raonic;
    group 2: ppl who can bother him if they get their act togather: Murray, Isner, Tsonga.

    have a good time in the US and tune in every now and again, maybe you’ll have a pleasent surprise.

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  6. I’m always amazed how we, as tennis fans, continually make bold prognostications about the next tournament based on what has just passed. I am as guilty of that as the next person, though over the last year I’ve tried to take on the role of Roger’s ardent cheerleader rather than making useless predictions of who will win the next trophy and why. I do this because I know, from experience, that the future has a way of humbling our preconceived notions of what ought to happen tommorow. Granted, it is now fair to say that Nadal is the clear favorite to win another French crown. But nothing is written in stone. A new Soderling could suddenly emerge, transferring the omen of auspisciousness to either Roger or Novak, depending on one’s particular leanings or prejudices. And it’s also valid to state that there’s at least a 90% chance that one of the Big Three will win at Roland Garros. Yet one always has to give that 10% nod to the Gods—a new teenaged wunderkind could be lurking unknown in our midst as we speak, ready to make his improbable march to the championship. It has happened before, and it will happen again. So let’s just sit back and enjoy the splendid theatricality of it all as we applaud and urge Federer on to hopefully ever-greater heights.

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    Vily Reply:

    I agree!!! All three have had their fair share of great results and disappointments.

    In tennis, you just never know!!!

    :-) ))

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    Ru-an Reply:

    Of course you never know. I’m just saying what is most likely to happen if you look at the past. I’m not basing my predictions on one season!

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  7. You might believe Djokovic’s game is “limited” but it was good enough to beat Nadal 7 straight times last year and on all surfaces. Now even though the Serb is far and away the world no.1 it isn’t good enough to get a set off the world no.3. Same game. Yet I remember just over 2 years ago in the second half of 2009 a skinny little Nadal couldn’t take a set off another top ten player. Something funny about this picture? Djokovic didn’t play badly against Nadal yesterday, Nadal made him miss because he never does. (It’s what Djoko did to Federer in the semi.) The Spaniard has obviously boosted his game from last year (and forget Indian Wells and Miami this year. Just not the same player.) Bigger faster stronger. It’s his only answer to a gluten-free Serb who had found a way through his absurd defence. But not any more. Watch also the picture revert to normal in the second half of the year after the USO, when Nadal loses once again to guys we never heard of. In the meantime everything is Nadal’s until at least the Olympics. I think it’s really funny that with Nadal people think they are watching a legit tennis match – like “The Rock” is real wrestling.

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  8. I still think he is getting assistance especially Sat.He is back to his games. He can’t be hurt one week and complain on blue clay and then win. I saw those arms in the pictures. He does not fool me.

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  9. No worries. Anyone else want to see another GRAND SLAM CELEBRATION from the master? Admit it, you’ve watched those 16 on youtube, and you just can’t get enough. GO FED!!! G

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  10. Ruan, I don’t think your entry today was negative at all. Everything you wrote was the truth. People naively responding, “this is tennis, anything can happen!” need to reflect on the FO results between Rafa and Fed in 2005-2008 and 2011. That’s 5 total beatdowns Nadal has administered to Fed. Even in 2005, when Roger was at his peak and Rafa had just turned 19, he pummelled Roger at the FO semis. So anyone who expects 30 year old Roger to beat prime Rafa is.. well… “overly optimistic.”

    If Roger meets Rafa again at this years FO I literally am not watching it. I have suffered through too many agonizing defeats there in the past and my hatred of Rafa grows and grows. I literally wish Roger would just chip and charge on every second serve and blanket the net. He is never going to outlast this steroid monster from the back of the court so come forward. At least it’s something different!

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    Ru-an Reply:

    Thanks Candace. I love how people call me negative or a coward when they might as well be called overly optimistic or dumb. People need to look at the facts and realize there is a difference between being realistic and being negative. Good to see some sense around here.

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  11. Ruan–i agree that if Nadal powers through the rounds at the french open as he has in the past, it will be less compelling tennis. BUT I agree wholeheartedly also with one of the comments above–I think Nole played a better match, was more aggressive, and Nadal looked nervous. I think Nole was expecting himself to win and got so ticked off after the first bad call that he never made his way back. My sense is that he will do better at the French and I expect to see them play a long ass final again, except I have no idea who will win. Rome showed me very little. Rafa still plays back and hits too many short balls–and that has got to be punished sooner than later. In many ways, I hope Murray takes out Rafa instead of Nole because that will just expose the chinks in his game more! What Nadal has that is magical is his mental focus. I remain impressed with that part of his game, child-like as he may be!

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    V Reply:

    Last post even i commented the same thing.To me,Nadal can only be defeated by a person who puts away those high back hand slices which seem to go even higher than his famous moonballs off the forehand.I think to beat Nadal,one has to have the willingness to come forward irrespective of being passed by crazy banana shots and should have a sound volley.Both Djokovic and Federer have absolutely great volleys but the thing is neither of them satisfy the first condition.Roger lets those crazy passes get to his head and as a result even misses the easy put aways while djokovic doesnt com often to the net.So realistically,something drastic happens,Nadal has an excellent chance of winning his 11 Gs ,but if Djokovic and Federer adopt the above tactics with aplomb,they have a more than decent chance of upsetting him.

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    Bharata Reply:

    That’s a really clear way of describing how to beat Nadal. Watching these matches is VERY frustrating because it seems there are so many easy put aways that even good players like Djokovic and Fed miss. Why do they miss them? I mean Nadal does this so much, and consistently gets away with it, that we can’t just dismiss it as luck. Maybe they are trying to hit perfect shots?

    Agree 100% Fed lets those magical passes get to this head. Still, I was very encouraged by the Indian Wells victory . But on clay Nadal retrieves everything.

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    veronica Reply:

    Yeah, why do they miss the easy put aways ALWAYS? Why do they ALWAYS allow Nadal to get to their heads/break them down mentally??!! Is Nadal a hypnotist or what??!! And why do they shy away from the net just because the beast magically pass them a few times?! I say go to the net, Fed, every time (like someone commented here), first AND second service, see how long the beast can pass you. There’s only so many times and if you are going to lose at the baseline anyway, why not try something different??!! See how “irrational” Fed was in his first set against Raonic?!! (even his team were shocked/puzzled/almost embarrassed by the frequency he went to the net). He doesn’t have to be as “crazy” as in the Raonic match but he could increase the net play much more in his matches against Nadal. He’s gotta learn to be tough, “thick-faced” and not allow the passes to get to him. All right, rant over!! Lol. Common Fed!!! The net is MADE for you!!!

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    veronica Reply:

    I’d like to bring my thoughts about Fed’s net play further. I’m speaking based on general overall Fed’s net play for last two years, and not on any particular match. Maybe some of you here could come in with your observations and opinions. I think while Anacone has played a huge role in making Fed’s net game relevant again, I often still find that Fed is unsure about when to come in. There have been numerous times when I felt he should have come in on a very good first serve but he didn’t and that he shouldn’t have come in on a lousy approach shot but he did! Sometimes he seems to come in as a “bluff” (which, I suppose is necessary sometimes to create a doubt or pressure to the opponent) Anyway, what I am trying to say is his decisions in coming to the net needs improvement. It has to be accurate, purposeful, decisive and threatening. One of the worst things to watch in a tennis match is a player running to the net foolishly not very sure what to do and don’t know the hell of what maybe coming (exhibit A – Roddick. Everytime he rushes to the net, I hold my breath) Fed’s volley/net play is excellent. It’s his decisions of when to come in is, I feel, needs improvement and some work to get him more confident and “natural” to come to the net to help make his overall game more effective. Thoughts, anyone?

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    V Reply:

    agreed Veronica.Fed really needs to stop coming on those shots which he hits very shot and allows the opponent to pass him.He need to have some purpose when coming to the net.if he comes in on a good shot and has a chance of winning it with a volley,only then should he come and if he wins ,its good for him and if he gets passed,it was a very good shot from the opponent.what he does when coming in is that he comes in when the opponent is in full great position to pass him and not when his opponent is out of position.so he gives his opponent so much time to settle and pass him.this may not cst him against other players, but against nadal,he will be murdered.its very difficult to get him out of position,and if and when he has done it,he must back himself to put away the volley by coming.I think Fed goes for too much angle against nadal rather than going for a sound volley which even if Nadal gets to it ,fed will be ready for another put away..when he plays for angles,he somehow has to get into an awkward position and so when nadal hits it back,fed himself is not in a position to hit another volley.I think this is his problem.So,if he can somehow leave out hitting angled volleys and go for more sound ones,i think he can really have a good chance of beating nadal.

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    veronica Reply:

    Exactly, V, that’s exactly what I meant. Sometimes I feel he doesn’t have purpose coming in and that he does it just because he wants to change things up. It’s sometimes so obviously painful that he shouldn’t come in; as you say, the opponent is in good position, the shot wasn’t good enough to come in and is just screaming for opponent to pass him. On the other hand, if he comes in on a good shot and yet get passed, he shouldn’t get discouraged and should keep at it because it was the right decision although he got passed. He seems to get confused sometimes about coming in : be discouraged when he shouldn’t be; and coming in when he should be backing off. Oh well, I hope he works hard in honing this skill because I really believe if he can get it more right, it would go a long way in helping him lift no. 17.

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  12. With all due respect – What absolute rubbish this is. How does Nadal winning Rome automatically translate into him winning the French? I admire your imagination, and you might even be right but these are pretty unfair predictions to make. Roger’s proved all you naysayers wrong time and time again. Give him a chance at least. Granted, him beating Nadal at the FO is a very long shot but that doesn’t justify all his fans turning into negative cowards.

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    Dave Reply:

    I agree.

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  13. Nah, don’t worry folks. FO will be an open slam. So far, each of the big 3 had won something significant which wasn’t the case last year. Anyone of Djoko, Nadal or Fed could win FO. 2012 is the most balanced year in recent years where there is no overwhelming favourite. Djoko has dipped but is still there and pacing himself nicely; Fed has had an incredible year so far of winning more than losing, is in top form and has overcome quite a few things he struggled with in 2011; Nadal has regained confidence against Djoko and is back to form. For the first time, all of the top 3 are in top form going into FO. Having said that, I’m a little worried about Fed’s physical state. He mentioned his injuries quite a few times which he normally do not like to mention. And he seems fatigued. This is my only concern. Otherwise, Fed is up to it, don’t worry. Rome? No sweat. Fed was exhausted. He wasn’t even supposed to play. He did what he had to, play some matches, gained some points. It would be a very foolish fan indeed to wish Fed to go all out to beat Djoko and Nadal in Rome. Don’t forget the long gruelling spring and summer ahead! Our old man really needs to choose his battles very very carefully from now on and especially for this year. As it is, playing Rome may even have aggravated his injuries/fatigue more. Let’s hope not. Remember how our champion thinks : “long term, short breaks, smart scheduling, listening to the body, etc.” However, having said all that, this year has to be the year for no. 17. Fed has to go all out (again, hope and pray injuries/fatigue not serious), otherwise the chances get really really slim by next year. Common Fed! REST and let’s practise finger wag 3.0!!! Btw, Ru-an just love the little Fed icons “whatever” in last post and “I’m cool” on this post. Have a safe trip to US! Very happy for you!!

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  14. For Nadal to win against top notch opposition on clay, he relies on errors from his opponent. If you are a shot maker at some point, you will run out of steam and start going for risky shots and the errors will pile up. Novak kept going for shots and making errors. At sometime in their matches recently, especially when he has had success, he has stuck to a safe game not going for too much and has forced Nadal to pull the trigger. I feel that he is not defending as well as last year. I don’t know if this is a conscious effort by Nole to extend his career, but since he is not defending as well, he is forced to go for more, playing very close to Nole of 2009 more than 2011. The building block of his success last year was his impenetrable defense. Rafa has had success with the same tactic for the last 6 years. Nole seems to have abandoned a working tactic. whether this is a clear strategy to save his effort for matches that matter(like back to back brutal matches at AO), or simply is an unsustainable strategy for him is not clear at this point. I did not see anything new from Nadal. He grinded and waited for errors and in this case Nole gave 40 of them. You can’t win against Rafa on clay having such a large gap between errors and winners

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    rich Reply:

    I think the difference this year is that Djokovic (anyone) finds it hard to stay in the rallies against Nadal because the Spaniard takes control of the point from almost anywhere in the court. It’s unbelievable how hard he is hitting, and from so deep a position. When put under that kind of pressure Djokovic can’t stay with him. He could last year. Nadal didn’t have that kind of power then and he would even sometimes miss. Not now. And despite what someone said earlier Nadal is getting so much more length than he used to. So many of his balls are now on or crowding the baseline. He is really impossible to attack. He is simply swatting his opponents away.

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    jarek Reply:

    How funny that we saw the same match so differently. Watched it again yesterday evening, and the thing that struck me was that he was dropping so many balls inside the service line. As always, they carry a lot of topspin but I sat there wondering, is it really that difficult to make anything better with those than making a medium hard shot to the other corner? When pressured, quite a lot of the returns from Nadal would drop close to the T. I guess, since world #1 couldn’t convert those then maybe it is impossible. Nadal, however, would usually make a winner out of any ball dropped near the T. I guess the spin makes the difference.
    Still, Novak made a very nervous impression on me. Roger at 95% would convert mane of those balls to winners. I’m note sure if he could pressure Nadal enough though.

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    Aravind Reply:

    Jarek, get the impression because Djokovic is not moving in, he is taking a lot of balls which land short lower in elevation than he would if he took it earlier and at the ball’s highest point. Because he is not taking the risk by going closer to the net, Nadal is getting away with balls landing short. But even at times when you go in behind a decent approach shot, you get some crazy screaming winners from Nadal and it demoralizes you.. I guess that is how difficult it is to beat Nadal on clay..Even if he stands 15 feet back, he has the sheer power in his shots to pass an opponent. It takes a unique blend of skills to beat Nadal on clay.. You need to have Federer’s attacking skills, a power of a Berdych and the guile of Nalbandian’s BH.. Safe to say such a player does not exist… The only guy that can remotely do any damage to Nadal is Del Potro at his peak form, but unfortunately he has been AWOL since his return from injury..

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  15. I knew Djokovic wouldn’t be able to out-machine the Machine forever.

    It’s not clear to me whether Nadal has indeed boosted significantly beyond last year (he was an absolute beast in the AO final, and Djokovic out-beasted him nonetheless), or whether Djokovic is no longer up for the brutal gauntlet that he must run to defeat Nadal, or possibly both.

    Nadal’s game works so well because there’s nothing going on upstairs; thought is not permitted to interfere. Whatever there was, and I doubt there was ever very much to begin with, has been suppressed by Uncle Toni’s machinations. He’s been turned into a tool that Uncle Toni switches on to win trophies, and then switches off afterward.

    With Djokovic the mental component is more of an issue. If he were making every final this year only to lose to Nadal every time, I’d say that it was almost entirely due to Nadal’s again gaining the physical edge.

    But the picture is clouded because he has been losing more this year, not just to Nadal: Murray, Isner, Tipsarevic. He lacks the intensity he had a year ago. He is not the same man who dominated virtually all of 2011.

    The margins are so tiny. If the will to win wanes even a fraction, it has a huge effect especially against Nadal, who punishes his opponent for the smallest mistakes and doesn’t give any free points.

    Mentally Djokovic may be imperceptibly shying away from the prospect of having to wear down Nadal. Had he won in Rome, it probably would have taken four or five hours of relentless grinding.

    Maybe, after 7 increasingly difficult victories, including the longest Grand Slam final ever, he just doesn’t have it in him anymore.

    A philosopher once said “He who fights monsters should take care not to become a monster.” So too with trying to out-grind the ultimate grinder. Each time Djokovic beat Nadal, he was forced descend to Nadal’s level of unthinking mindlessness. He had to dedicate his full concentration to the monotonous and repetitive task of slugging it out with Nadal for hours and hours. Eventually the mind rebels against such mechanical tedium.

    As a result his game degenerated and his performance suffered. While Nadal remains the same, because there is no mind up there.

    At the back of Djokovic’s mind, there may be a little voice saying: “is it really worth putting myself through four or five hours of torture just for a shiny trophy and a couple more million bucks?” Once that happens, it’s all over. You can’t beat Nadal with a half-hearted effort, or even a 99.9%-hearted effort.

    This ought to increase our appreciation for Federer, who’s continued to battle mightily after the most brutal defeats to Nadal.

    Djokovic is motivated by other things besides the pure love of tennis. That’s not a knock on him, most athletes have all sorts of reasons for playing, many of which often have nothing to do with love of their sport. Some do it to escape lives of poverty, some do it for fame, some do it because they’re not suited for any other profession, some do it to compensate for some deficiency in their personal lives, etc.

    But those motives can only sustain you for so long. If you play a game not for the love of the game, but for something the game can do for you, then once that need is satisfied you no longer have a reason to devote yourself to the game.

    Over the last year, Djokovic has tasted glory, he’s been #1, won three of the four majors, been showered with fame and praise, become a national hero in Serbia and boosted his country’s profile, accumulated millions of dollars. Maybe it’s all made him complacent, and perhaps he’s lost just a little bit of his taste for battle.

    Federer’s love of the game continues to burn brightly even after all these years. After Federer won IW, John McEnroe wondered how he could still be motivated enough to fight for a Masters title at his age.

    Late in his career, Sampras once said something like it was hard for him to care about San Jose (a smaller tournament) anymore.

    I can’t imagine Federer ever saying such a thing. You can see his joy and delight in winning even a comparatively small event like Rotterdam. No matter the venue, he enjoys the challenge of pitting himself against the best of the best.

    His spirit remains undimmed and his appetite for competition just as sharp as ever.

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    veronica Reply:

    Agree Steve, small voice in Djoko this year is whispering to him otherwise. Djoko is not a machine and is very emotional although he is also very driven and ambitious. He could stay with Nadal last year because he had something to prove but the victories had worn him down. He can’t keep up or rather, his subconscious refuse to keep up with Nadal. A human can’t beat a machine forever. Sorry to bring the juice up but I agree with Rich – just smells too fishy to me, the whole Nadal make-up : the endless energy, the cycles, the abrupt turnarounds. I’ve never seen or heard a sports player past and present who is as tireless as Nadal or as “cyclic” as him. I’m just surprised tennis commentators haven’t picked up/questioned his machine-like perfections. Sorry folks to bring this up but it is always at the back of my mind every time I watch the machine play. But still, I have hope in the “human” perfection beating the “machine” perfection!! Common Fed!!! It’s Humans V Machines!! The future of Humankind, of perfect human tennis, rests in your hands!!

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  16. Bonjour, checked my foggy crystal ball aujourd’hui and saw that monsieur Nadal will not bite this year “La Coupe des Mousquetaires”. Looking for his uncle Tony in a desperate moment, he will stumble over one of his water bottles (the chilled one) and twist very bad his ankle. I think this incident will help Monsieur Federer a lot.

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  17. Wow, what a bunch of whiny bitches in here! PATHETIC

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    Jiten Reply:

    But you are the WHINNIEST!

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    Ru-an Reply:

    The irony is strong with you.

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    Maria Reply:

    pot meet kettle. are you still bitter because Fed was #2 for less than a week? He is at #3 where he belongs. we know you were hoping Rafa would be crushed, but guess what? never underestimate Rafa. He has the resolve to accept defeat and come back STRONGER which makes him one of the greats. DEAL WITH IT.

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    veronica Reply:

    Welcome, Maria, to Federer land! – just in case you think you are in Rafa land!! Everything looks and smells so …..Federer, isn’t it?! There are a hundred and one rude comments I was tempted to say to you when I read your provocative comment but I choose not to. In Federer land, people weep and whine when Fed is not performing. In Federer land we DEAL WITH IT in multiple different ways and we are SECURE enough to reveal our insecurities to each other. I am completely in agreement with you that Roger deserves no. 3, no doubt about it; but maybe some of us choose to cry over it a little? Is that so hard for you to deal with?! Maybe you need to be a bit more secure and not have to be so defensive that Rafa is the better player, which Rafa definitely is?

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    Jiten Reply:

    Bee meets honey. HONEY, without the honey, your bee will not even be in the top 100. Let’s see what happens once the clay season is over. Your bee will no longer be able to sting.

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