Final Thoughts on Wimbledon 2012, Greatest Grand Slam Event Ever

Hey guys I have some time off of late and I thought I’d make another post about Wimbledon. It certainly deserves another. In my book it was the best Wimbledon ever. The year Ivanisevic won was pretty special. In 2009 when Roger broke the slam record I thought it was the ultimate. But I liked this Wimbledon even better. First of all Nadal lost in the second round to a rampant Rosol. That already makes it a pretty special Wimbledon, but that was just the start. I predicted things would improve for Roger as soon as the grass court season started, but I also knew the Nadal factor was there.

So when Nadal lost I knew here was a big opportunity for Roger. Djokovic was still in his way, but I felt Roger was the favorite on grass, knowing that there would be no Nadal waiting for him in the final. But first there was the Benneteau match. This match was the key to the championship for Roger. He came within two points of losing in the fourth set. I remember watching it and asking Roger why he is putting me through this. He really flirted with disaster in that match. But it was one of those mentally tough matches that we have gotten used to from Roger 3.0. It was the kind of match that Roger 2.0 would have lost.

Roger 2.0 just lacked that extra motivation that was needed to get through this kind of match. That extra will to win. I don’t know why that will ever went away. I think it may be because of the demoralizing losses he suffered to Nadal. He needed some time to recover from them. And since the US Open last year he seemed to have gotten rid of those demons. I call him Roger 3.0 since then because he turned over a new leaf. His heart was back in it. He was willing to grind out a match on those days when things didn’t go his way. His will to win was back. And that made all the difference.

It gave him a new confidence. It lifted his whole game. He is almost back in his prime since then. He still has his off days but now grinds it out instead of giving in. The match against Benneteau was the key because he came so close to losing, but he willed himself to win. That gave him confidence because he knew he could trust himself when it mattered. In the next match against Malisse he had the injury scare, but when he came through it I believed it would be ok. And in the next match against Youzhny he was already over it. JesusFed was back, just in time for the all important Djokovic semi-final.

I felt he was the favorite for this match even though many doubted him. I predicted long before this match that Roger would teach Djokovic lesson in grass court tennis, and that is what happened. He didn’t have the burden on him of having to deal with Nadal in the final, so he could just focus fully on that match, knowing that if he won it it would probably be good enough to win the title. So I’m sure he pretty much treated that match as the final. I knew Roger was simply a better grass court player than Djokovic, and on a good day he would win. He didn’t have much trouble in beating Djokovic either.

He almost ran away with that fourth set as he had opportunities to get the double break. After he won that he still had Murray to take care of who was the British hope, and who was playing some good tennis. But I knew Roger wanted this badly and would rise to the occasion. That’s what he did and the rest is history. After winning the second set it was pretty straight forward. From the quarter finals onwards, which is the business end of slams, it was a masterclass of grass court tennis by the best grass court tennis player in history. And here is the stats to prove it:

[QUOTE=Juz78;12205259]

Wimbledon titles
Federer – 7
Sampras – 7

Wimbledon finals
Federer – 8
Sampras – 7

Wimbledon semi finals
Federer – 8
Sampras – 8

Consecutive Wimbledon titles
Federer – 5
Sampras – 4
NOTE : Sampras had 2 runs, one of 3 straight titles and one of 4. Fed had one run.

Wimbledon win-loss record
Federer – 67-7
Sampras – 63-7

Grass titles outside Wimbledon
Federer – 5
Sampras – 3[/QUOTE]

http://www.menstennisforums.com/showthread.php?p=12205259#post12205259

Something that got left out above is that Roger has a 1-0 head-to-head record over Sampras on grass. There can be no doubt now that Roger is the greatest on grass. The numbers don’t lie. But I also think he is the greatest ever now. He denied that in a roundabout way in an interview and rightly so, because it’s difficult to compare eras and he was being respectful to past greats. But he is the best of this era anyway and this may just be the strongest era ever. You have Nadal who is surely the clay GOAT and now you have Djokovic too. I think Roger and Nadal are the GOAT and the clay GOAT. It just makes sense.

They have utterly dominated their era, and now Djokovic is also coming to the party. It’s a great time for tennis. Murray is also catching up. I don’t care whether Roger wins any more slams from here on. This Wimby title was really the cherry on top. That doesn’t mean that he can’t win any more slams. I think he can add at least one more. In fact I’d like to see him aim for 20. And you certainly won’t put it beyond Roger. I just think this Wimbledon title was extremely special and it gave me a feeling of completeness and saturation. The 16 slam titles was already very satisfying, but something was still missing.

Winning #17 at Wimbledon, equalling Sampras’ 7 Wimby titles, and equalling his number of weeks at number one just had that peRFect feeling about it. It all just came together, as if it was destiny. But of course there are always new challenges and new things to achieve. For instance the upcoming Olympics and US Open. Then there is also the 6 year end number ones of Sampras. Things can always be more perfect. The Olympic gold in singles, a slam record of his own, and the 6 years as number one can all be viewed as things that are still missing from his resume. It doesn’t matter much. It would just be nice if he gets them.

And who would bet against him achieving them? He will be a huge favorite at the Olympics which will also be played at Wimbledon. The same goes for winning the US Open. And his chances of ending the year ranked number one is pretty good you’d have to say. I am excited for the rest of this year. Roger must be super confident and relaxed right now and I believe he will achieve much more this year. He may even dominate proceedings completely from here on, like in his prime. He is back where he belongs at #1. I think he’d like to stay a while…

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105 Comments

  1. Ru-an, I’m glad you made another post, as I feel like we’re all still in “seventh heaven”

    Roger’s hard work has truly paid off, and I know it will continue to do so. I also feel satisfied, and will still feel content even if he doesn’t achieve anything else. What he grasped in that Wimbledon final is untouchable, and I’m looking forward to see what this confidence will provide for him in the coming weeks, months, and future seasons. He’s healthy, his family is healthy, and he is still achieving success no one thought he could still achieve at 30 years old, almost 31. He made commentators eat their words and caused many to drop their jaws.

    I also understand exactly what you meant about Roger’s will to win returning. That Benneteau match really spoke volumes to me. Being on vacation, I didn’t get the chance to watch any of Wimbledon (but I came home in time for the men’s final) and when I read the score of that match, I was undoubtedly worried, thinking… Roger, what are you doing, this title belongs to you… but no matter what terrible thoughts went through my mind, I had this feeling that he could make a comeback. I just couldn’t see Benneteau beating him. Just like I couldn’t see Del Potro beating him in RG. I think Roger’s age is really just a number, because when I see him play, you can see how much he loves the game. How much he still wants to engrave his name into the record books, and have the opportunity of his girls watching him play. He has so much motivation – and you know what, I think that Nadal and Djokovic’s being here are a major factor of all of his success in the past year. Roger made those changes to his game because he has a clear goal in mind to obtain all of his goals.

    Roger 3.0 is looking good, and I can’t wait for the Olympics! He has such a great shot, and it would make his GOAT label golden…

    [Reply]

    jason Reply:

    Golden GOAT has a pretty nice ring about it, indeed. A hectic schedule for Roger for the rest of the year. Usually after Wimbledon, there is a long holiday before the US hardcourt season. Now that holiday is taken by the Olympics.

    While I’m very positive about Roger’s chances, we should put more realistic expectations. There are several milestones:
    1. Olympics win
    2. Record 6th US Open win
    3. 6 seasons as no. 1
    To achieve those are truly a monumental task because it would involve winning/going very deep in ATP1000 Series, too. Roger is no longer young and his back has some issues sometimes.

    To complicate matters a bit, the Olympics carry relatively small points: 750. It’s less than the ATP1000 Series, while it will take lots of effort to win it.

    Anyways, just want to give a bit of realistic touch…I’d be truly pleasantly surprised if he achieves those by end of 2012. But if not, this year is already great. I just want to see Roger 3.0 playing well, and not burn out quickly.

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  2. He had failed by one week – and then it took him several years of extremely hard work to come back to being #1 and finish as the best ever! It was not enough for Roger to just have more Grand Slam wins than Pistol Pete, as long as the latter held more titles at Wimbledon and more weeks at the #1 ranking. So he defied the critical press, the groundline warriors, the family demands and the biological clock, and he went out to get the job done! Had he not achieved this, we would always have felt that something was missing, that he climbed the mountain without really reaching the very top, that he fell short on some very important records. Now it’s all done! Now I feel that the picture is peRFect! There is nothing missing. His girls watching him holding the trophy at Wimbledon was purely magic. I for my part am finally satisfied, as a fan I feel no more hungry for more achievements, titles and records from Roger Federer. He did it all! He is our small nation’s hero! And he is an inspiration to many in the world. Congratulations and thank you Roger for going the extra mile all the way back to #1, and thank you apostle Ru-an for keeping us, the doubters, united in the belief that the lord of tennis would resusitate eventually as the King and gracefully smile at those who had repudiated him publicly, repeatedly and shamelessly.

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  3. As fans, we can’t really ask for any more from Roger now. He gave us the joy of seeing him hoist another Slam, reclaimed the #1, and has given us endless happiness. But even after saying that, we all know Roger is not going to stop. He’ll continue to be a threat for Slams for the next year or two surely, and who’s to say he won’t get #18 at the US Open? (Especially if he plays with the motivation he had at Wimbledon.) After this amazing victory, nobody should ever doubt Roger again, and he has proved that age is only a number for him. One month shy of 31, he looked as fit as a 21 year-old and moved around the court like one as well. May Roger gain continued happiness for the rest of his career!

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  4. 1,7,17 are the magic numbers in tennis these days. As fan I can ask for one more thing from Roger, to play at Rogers Cup so I can watch him live, if I could get an autograph on court from the GOAT I’ll be much happier than he was on Sunday ;-)

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  5. I still keep thinking about the win. For some reason, it just doesn’t quite seem like it really happened. Am I alone in this?
    Also, being Canadian, I was very proud of the boys, girls and girls doubles win. Looks like we have some great prospects coming up. Raonic is a good role model for the juniors on the rise.

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  6. Hi Ruan, you are absolutely right. Many fans have also stated the same, that this victory sort of completes everything. I can’t describe that feeling and I think you have done a very good job at that anyway so I shall not try.
    I still remember someone here mentioned and compared Roger to Mohammad Ali’s mental toughness. Roger has now firmly proved his very own by returning to the top and winning the most important slam at this stage of his career. This achievement is monumental and puts him beyond the debate of tennis GOAT and right up there with the best ever athletes/legends like Ali, Jordan, Pele, etc. I am so proud of him and he will always be my inspiration in life.
    I seldom post so would like to take this opportunity to wish you the very best in your own quest of success in the States. Cheers!

    [Reply]

    Ru-an Reply:

    Thanks Onefly.

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  7. Roger’s 7th Wimbledon title is a new feat in his already splendid career, but I don’t consider it as the completion of it. The circle isn’t round yet to me.
    I myself have never seen Roger playing as well as he did in the third and fourth set of his match against Andy Murray : serves, overheads, stopvolleys and running drive and backhand volleys, dropshots, slices and topspin backhands,… everything executed with a fantastic display of mastery of the game. It was just incredible. I haven’t had the privilige to see Roger playing during his prime years, but I think his display in the Wimbledon final was probably at least as good..
    As far as this Wimbledon title is concerned, i think we may not forget to mention the favorable conditions Roger enjoyed here at Wimbledon: with a Djokovic not going into Wimbledon in particularly superb form and a Nadal crashing out early in the second round, as well as the capricious weather circumstances, Roger found a very nice platform to recapture the Wimbledon title and to engage in a successful assault on the number one position of Novak Djokovic.
    Though I’m very, very happy with Roger’s 7th Wimbledon title, I must admit that I was very surprised and disappointed with Roger’s reaction to Nadal’s loss in the second round. Telling a journalist that you’ve been laughing for about ten minutes with the way Lukas Rosol was playing out of his mind in the fifth set, was in my eyes a very inappropriate and insensitive reaction to Nadal’s loss, regardless of what Roger might have meant by it exactly. The least you can say is that Roger was being very clumsy in this interview if not showing a complete lack of respect for Nadal, who himself was gracious in his defeat.
    This brings me to my only remaining wish as far as Roger’s career is concerned. I think there is still some unfinished business between Roger and his nemesis, and I really want Roger to take care of this business one or another day. I hope he’ll defeat Rafael Nadal at least once more in a slam outside of Wimbledon, regardless of winning this slam or not. I believe the form he showed in the Wimbedon final will suffice to defeat Nadal in a 4 or 5-setter. I myself prefer it to be at Roland Garros, Nadal’s own turf so to speak, but a win over Nadal at the US open or the AO would delight me alike.

    [Reply]

    Chris Reply:

    I just love your comment Wilfried, t’as tout a fait raison! I ignore what Roger said about Nadal’s loss, and I would be careful to take for real what journalists write, they are always out for a story. But if Federer has said that he laughed 10min straight when seeing Nadal lose in the second round, then that’s great! Because that is the attitude he needs to overcome this last challenge remaining! He shall truly hate Nadal! He shall go out there and destroy the Spanish bull, have him run around until his knees give up on court! Now that Federer has achieved the ultimate goal of going back to #1, the only thing remaining is to get revenge from Nadal. Personally, I don’t expect this nor do I necessarily wish for it. Because it will bring out the bad side of Roger Federer. I believe that Nadal is doping. I can however imagine that Federer is not doping, because of the different style of play. If I am right, then Federer has lost quite a few titles to a cheater. That is a sound reason to support your claim. Let’s hope for an ultimate win, a knock-out of Nadal by the racket of Federer! Aren’t we greedy guys…

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    Michel Reply:

    Mr. Ruan you’re are too passionate. The best approach to beat Nadal is not to think about it too much. As Soderling said after beating Nadal three years ago: “I told myself that it was just another match. I was just playing as if it was a training session. It was only when I was two or three points away that I started to believe.” I think Rosol called Soderling before his match with Nadal ;-)

    Should I play Mr. Nadal I would also try to kick ‘by mistake’ his water bottles during first game change.

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    Ru-an Reply:

    Agreed Chris. This is tennis, not religion. These guys ae out there to make war not love. It is just a fact. You can’t have things both ways. I liked Roger’s attitude, whatever he implied. He must hate Nadal if he wants to beat him. He has been too nice to him in the past and it cost him dearly. No more mister nice guy.

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    Michel Reply:

    I think Roger laughed more than 10 min after seeing this

    http://www.durangoherald.com/storyimage/DU/20120629/SPORTS01/706299989/AR/0/AR-706299989.jpg&ExactW=620

    Nadal was gracious in his defeat ?!

    “First Rafael Nadal took a tumble into the net. Then he began complaining to the umpire. Then he bumped his opponent, Lukas Rosol, during a changeover.Rosol thought the contact was intentional.”

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    Ru-an Reply:

    Yeah Nadal was the opposite of gracious in defeat. His behaviour was simply shocking. There was nothing gracious about it whatsoever.

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    Wilfried Reply:

    I think we’ll have to agree to disagree, Ruan, as far as Nadal’s attitude is concerned (in the Nadal-Rosol match).
    I agree with you with regard to his attitude during the match : he looked out of sorts, was very irritated at times and obviously not always in control of himself.
    But I think Nadal’s ultimate conduct at the end of the match, once his defeat was an established fact, was a very decent one : he willingly shaked hands with Lukas Rosol and even handed Rosol’s racket back to Rosol (who threw his racket towards the net), despite the crushing feeling this loss must have inflicted on him.
    You can watch the last points and the handshake-moment in a video included in this article here if you like to do so :
    http://www.melty.fr/wimbledon-2012-rafael-nadal-elimine-au-deuxieme-tour-par-lukas-rosol-a115443.html

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    Flo Reply:

    Actually it is worse in my view at someone would try to use these ploys during the match to try to affect the opponent and make him play worse, then act all courteous at the end of the match when the result is final. It means he knew what he was doing during the match was gamesmanship and it was not because he could not control his emotions. Way more cynical.

    As to Federer”s reaction, he explained that it was not at the expense of Nadal just that you would never expect Rosol to be able to zone him in the fifth. If you do not believe that that is your perogative but I am sure most tennis fans were surprised and non Nadal fans pleasantly so.

    [Reply]

    Wilfried Reply:

    I actually think we do not have the right to think we know the player’s intentions and innermost thoughts and feelings, which is why I tend to simply go by what I see and by what the players tell us.
    Roger said he didn’t say those comments to the expense of Nadal, so I’ll accept that.
    As for Nadal’s behaviour during his match against Rosol, I think we should have the same attitude and accept what Nadal had to say about it, except in this case, as far as I know, Rafael Nadal was never asked for his opinion about what happened. The reporters only asked Rosol for his opinion. Rosol’s comments however should be contextualized, as the guy is widely disliked by his fellow players, at least according to TomTebbut (who doesn’t just randomly say things unless he’s really got good sources / evidence). It could well be that Nadal got really irritated by the way Rosol conducted himself on the court for instance.
    http://www.tenniscanada.com/index.php?title=Tebbutt:-A-Shell-Shocked-Wimbledon&pid=3918
    Anyways, I think Nadal lost confidence by this unexpected loss and I wouldn’t be surprised if he crashes out early as well in the Olympics.

    [Reply]

    Flo Reply:

    I think all things are up for interpretation but I suggest not viewing those two events as comparable. Federer volunteered an answer to a specific question regarding hs private reaction to Nadal’s loss. He could have said anything or nothing, there was nothing in it for him. From his pattern of behaviour in the presser he just thought that was a harmless kinda interesting thing and no big deal. He already qualified his statement to avoid your interpretation.

    Nadal’s event was something that happened in fro of the entire audience. Whatever answer he would have had would have gone to mitigating his atrocious behaviour but not fully because he wasin the wrong. Either it was out of frustration or as a calculated ploy, both unacceptable in my eyes. And in view of his pattern of behaviour I judge that the latter is more probable. More so in light of his “friendly”gestures post match.

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    Wilfried Reply:

    I understand what you mean and I see your point and agree with it to a certain point. We’re not sure if, in the case of Nadal, his conduct was the result of frustration or a calculated ploy, or the furious expression of « macho » behaviour of a Spanish latino.
    As far as Federer’s words are concerned, I think we’re talking here about « the topplayer by excellence ». His « private reaction to Nadal’s loss » becomes – by nature of the interview – a « public affair », because all what Federer says in interviews with a reporter is read and watched by many people on tv and in the internet. In the light of this, the words he speaks are as important as his conduct on court, and both should be in harmony with each other.
    In this particular interview with the reporter Roger Federer simply could have said that Lukas Rosol had been playing amazing in the fifth set, and he could have left it hereby. But no, he felt urged to say that he had been laughing with it for about ten minutes. Those words fit imo perfectly in a context of « war » as Ruan described the situation so well, but not in a context of empathy and sympathy for one another. Saying afterwards that he feels sorry for Nadal doesn’t completely undo or requalify the words he already has spoken before imo. The harm has been done, and you can try to mitigate the effect of them afterwards, but the spoken words remain. You can’t delete them anymore.
    In my original post, I just wanted to express my surprise and disappointment with this, without making a judgement as such. I know nobody is perfect, i’m certainly not and Federer isn’t either. His tennis is almost perfect though, but his words are sometimes clumsy and insensitive. I prefer Roger to have more tact and battle it out on the court, not elsewhere. You bet the next time when Roger and Rafael will meet each other on court, Nadal will eagerly want to kick Roger’s …. And i think he still has the means to do it.

    [Reply]

    Ru-an Reply:

    Yes Wilfried, the circle is not quite complete yet. I don’t care much for the Olympics but I guess he has the win a gold in singles. Then I’d really like to see him win another USO after what transpired the last three years. He should win one more if we are honest. Thend he must end this year #1 to equal Sampras’ record. That is another very important record. If he achieves those three things this year it would be amazing, and he can do it. He is on a high. He has the game to do it. But even if he achieves all those things I’d like to see him win 20 slams. I mean Roger 3.0 is good enough to do that and therefor he should. He should achieve whatever he is capable of achieving. Beating Nadal in a RG final is a tall order, but like you I would love to see him beat Nadal in the USO.

    [Reply]

    Kyle Reply:

    Knowing Roger, do you really think that he was laughing at Nadal? I think he was more or less shocked that Rosol was able to play the kind of tennis he did in such a big match. I mean, it was really mind-blowing. I was laughing too – not to disrespect Nadal, but because so rarely we see that kind of performance in sport that when it happens it’s just shocking.
    I just read an article about the Federer comments and he actually said that he was laughing at the audacity of what he had seen – that it was still possible for such a major upset to happen. By NO MEANS WHATSOEVER was Fed meaning his remarks as disrespect to Nadal.

    [Reply]

  8. Thanks for the post Ruan.
    what i like about your blog – eventhough i sometimes disagree with ya, most of the time i find you are accutrately putting into words the feeling of us Fedfans. so thanks a lot for that.
    one thing i wanna add – huge credit to PA and the whole RF staff for a job well done!!

    [Reply]

    Ru-an Reply:

    Thanks feddybear, I appreciate your ongoing support of my blog. I’m glad that I’ve had some time of late to catch up with you guys and that my blog is still going strong.

    [Reply]

  9. Woah guys, I just want to share this one with you, running the risk that my good old friend Pam complains again that I should get a life instead of commenting way too much on this blog ;-) . I just discovered this tennis documentary on youtube, it’s all about the Masters Cup in 2004 and the ‘what could be the GOAT in tennis’ Roger Federer. Oh my God, watching this I really come to realize the journey Roger has had through this sport. Watch it, these were the times when 30 year old Tim Henman was struggling to keep up because of his age, and there was no Murray, Nadal or Djokovic around. I really enjoyed watching this, and I hope some of you will too. Great behind the scenes, incredible to see how far back Federer already installed his mark on the game. Enjoy!

    Facing Federer: Tennis Masters Cup Uncovered http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hfpLBr9kOYQ&feature=related

    [Reply]

    spaniel Reply:

    Great video! Thanks, I missed it somehow…

    [Reply]

  10. I would agree that with this latest victory, and the way that it was acomplished, Roger is arguably the greatest player ever. No one has won as many slams and all on different suraces. That said, I would hesitate to claim that he is the greatest ever on grass. Why? Because, quite simply, he has equalled Sampras’s record, not surpassed it – yet. Their h2h counts for little. They met – once – at the end of Sampras’s career, when he had already won his 7 Wimbledon titles, and Roger had yet to rise to the top of the game. The sample is too small for an accurate assessment. Who knows what would have happened if they had been of the same generation and met regularly in Wimbledon finals during Pete’s heyday in the 90’s. McEnroe has said that he considers Roger to be probably the greatest player ever. But he also said that “it doesn’t matter who you are – on a fast court, on his day, Pete could close anyone down”. After his 1999 Wimbledon drubbing by Pete, Agassi would have to confirm that. You have to respect the player who was the first to capture 7 Wimbledon crowns. Granted, Pete was probably not the all-round player that Roger is – there is no FO in his resume – but if the 2012 Wimbledon final had been between Roger and Pete in his prime I wouldn’t have wanted to bet on the outcome. Murray is no Sampras. Agassi will also tell you that.

    [Reply]

    Ru-an Reply:

    Agassi is no Sampras either. And Sampras is no Federer.

    [Reply]

    rich Reply:

    You’re right. Agassi and Sampras – a couple of bums. Only 22 slams between them. Now to beat Murray – that’s the true measure of greatness.

    [Reply]

    Ru-an Reply:

    The way Roger is going he might win more than both of them together ;-)

    [Reply]

    rich Reply:

    We might be getting ahead of ourselves here. It’s 2 and 1/2 years since he won his last slam before this Wimbledon – that’s a long time between drinks. He’s nearly 31. Fingers crossed – let’s hope he wins at least one more – and not in another 2 and 1/2 years! The USO this year has got to be his next (and possibly last) best shot. A year is a long time in the life of a professional sportsman (as we saw with Rog in 2010) so next year is too far way to contemplate.

    [Reply]

    jason Reply:

    Agree with Rich to a point, we might be getting ahead of ourselves to expect that. Yes, one year is a long time in a professional sportsman’s time. But this also applies to the other guys, particularly Djokovic & Nadal.

    Most top tennis players peak at around 25-26 or earlier. Examples: Sampras (25), Roger (26), Djokovic (24), Nadal (22), Borg (23-24), Hewitt (21). The question is how high the peak & how fast the decline. Of course there are exceptions such as Agassi, but also note that he had a peculiar career.

    So far, Djokovic’s decline has been quite steep (but consider the peak he reached, as well). How strong he can bounce remains a question. Nadal’s is surprisingly not steep, against all of our expectations… but we should see about the next years. Murray is probably at his peak or near that. What remains in question is how far he will go with that. As for the rest of the field, I just feel there’s not enough talent to seriously challenge the big 4 (not 3 anymore here) at least for now. Tsonga is too inconsistent, Delpo is too injury-prone and has been the shadow of himself after 2009 US Open title.

    If by chance Djokovic & Nadal decline steeply from now on, it’s not inconceivable that Roger reaches Steffi’s number in GS, which interestingly is the sum between GS wins of Sampras & Agassi.

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  11. Below is an article which gives an overview regarding Roger’s tactics against Murray. If anything, it shows how Roger seems to at least start to be willing to change his attitude towards the game… and of course, what a successful partnership with Annacone he has.

    If he’s willing to adjust, and change his attitude like he showed, who knows… maybe he still has 3-4 slams inside him (although as I have mentioned previously, I don’t put any expectations).

    Murray is perhaps the 2nd best defensive player right now (after Nadal). The fact that Roger had the audacity to come into the net 68 times tells something very important.

    http://straightsets.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/07/10/breaking-it-down-federer-vs-murray/

    [Reply]

  12. I have the same feeling as Sue. Still haven’t fully processed this victory or what it means yet.

    What will Federer play for now? There’s Nadal, of course. Beating him at RG is one of the few remaining challenges out there for Federer.

    Have we seen the best days of Novak Djokovic? Are he and Federer going to square off in more classic matches?

    Will there be new rivals, with new and different styles, for him to face? That’s probably the thing that will keep him going. Let’s hope a new generation will arise to spur him on to perfect his tennis yet further.

    As a fan, I’ll just sit back and enjoy what he has left to give us. The process, not the result, is what’s important. Clearly he loves playing tennis, and we love watching him, so it’s a perfectly satisfactory situation.

    [Reply]

  13. Ruan congrats on a very inspired article as usual.
    One request if you please. I would be very much interested in reading your view on the ways Paul Annacone has influenced Roger’s game. What do you think are the major differences between pre and during “Annacone’s era”. Thanks in advance and please keep your posts rate as high as possible.

    [Reply]

    Ru-an Reply:

    Thanks mvasil. As I find my feet over here in the US I will post more. The last month was just crazy. I will see what I can do about your request.

    [Reply]

  14. Thanks for the great read Ruan. I’ve got to say that Roger Federer is a true sporting hero of mine, and after all he’s achieved, he still doesn’t get the recognition he deserves, although I do know he’s an absolute hero in his homeland.

    I’ve mentioned this before a few times, but if there are any budding sportsmen out there that need a role model, they need look no further than Roger Federer.

    He has the class of a true champion, but with humility and modesty. Federer is the model professional sportsman.

    [Reply]

  15. Hi Ru-an! What a wonderful post! You echo all my thoughts exactly. And you are right; it would be doing Fed a great injustice not to have more posts on his historic win and in particular, this year’s Wimbledon which I suspect, is the best in history. I’m a bit peeved that I didn’t post congrats here as soon as Fed won. I was so nervous watching the first set that I twitched my side/back (don’t know how the hell it happened) and I couldn’t sit properly for days!! Anyway, belated cyber drinks to Fed family here. And, to all you naysayers, so-called experts, journalists (looking at you, McEnroe, Gilbert, Ubha), here’s another round of CROW for all of you!!! Like Fed and some of you here, this hadn’t quite sunk in yet for me. All that longing, of hopes dashed again and again, it is just so hard to believe that it has finally happened. 2012 has been such a monumental year for Fed; and we are only halfway through the year. What Fed went through this year so far could already fill a book. I wish some Fed fan could write this book (maybe your next project, Ru-an?!) : the struggles, the turnarounds, the achievements. It would be such a pity if the “richness” of what Fed went through/achieved in 2012 were not compiled into a book. Watching Fed 3.0 play in the semis and final took a bit of getting used to : gone were the “compulsory” shanks, and the depth, the power, lethal forehand AND backhand, the half volleys, the serve, etc, etc. Gosh, it was just too much and just too good to be true! And what about his mental toughness and focus?! Scary! He didn’t get rattled by all the the missed chances but kept at it. 10 deuces man! And he played every one of them as if it was the first one! So different from USO, eh?!! In fact I felt he was so focused that when he finally won, he couldn’t quite relax and let go. As he admitted himself, he dared not dream about winning or holding a trophy again. It would take him quite a while to really take it all in. In retrospect, I think the tough losses had to happen in order to break down his stubbornness to finally look deeper into himself and thus Roger 3.0 was born!! And to Paul Anacone – RESPECT and well done!! Ru-an, if Nadal had been in the final, do you think Fed would have beaten him? I think so. In fact Fed has already beaten him twice this year. And with so many wins this year and brimming with confidence now, it is the best time to take on Nadal. I hope they meet in Olympics and USO and Fed has a chance to really put the demons to rest. What a roller coaster ride these 2 and half years have been! I wouldn’t have survived without your blog, Ru-an, and all you family here. Like you, Ru-an, I am satisfied at 17. No more longing, no more demands. I will finally watch a Fed match without any expectation and just enjoy his game. Having said that, I hope he wins Olympics and USO and if he wants to go for 20, I’m game. But officially, for me, the nervousness, the heartbreaks, the wishing for one more slam, ends at 17(breathes a huge sigh of blessed satisfied relief!) Last but not least, to dear Dolores, hugs from me to you! Your instincts were right – Fed did win 17!! And he’s back to no. 1!! Yay!!

    [Reply]

  16. I hope you recover quickly from your back problems! Good to see you on this blog again, I already wondered…

    [Reply]

    veronica Reply:

    Ha ha! Chris! thanks! You are one of the “backbones” of this blog, holding it up for Ru-an regularly – I suppose I could depend on you to hold up my back too!!!! Heehee!!!

    [Reply]

  17. Thanks for the return hug, Veronica.
    Have missed you….sorry about your back pain, all the best for a good recovery. Yes, was so pleased with Roger’s masterpiece performance at Wimbledon 2012. All of us on Ru-an’s blog were celebrating. Now onto the Olympics, it will be exciting.
    Kindly,
    Dolores

    [Reply]

    veronica Reply:

    Now… who is the grandma?!!!! Lol! I felt so stupid because usually only old ladies get their backs injured!! I didn’t tell anybody about this “injury” except you guys here, shh! Lol! But the pain was all WORTH it!!!!! And now…a moment of heart wrenching silence for Andy Murray (tears welling up). What a pathetic, self-loathing, but yet endearing person. I’ve always thought Murray is more genuine and upfront than Nadal/Djoko. I really hope he wins a slam soon. It would be sweet indeed the day he could beat Nadal and Djoko. OK, I am officially a Murray fan now!! “God save Andy!! (the Queen)”

    [Reply]

    Chris Reply:

    Nothing to do with grandma, you just passed the acid test of being a real fan! When Roger wins, we all rejoice, but when Roger’s back hurts, only Veronica’s back hurts as well!!

    [Reply]

    veronica Reply:

    Gosh! Chris! You are a ……GENIUS!!! What an “honour” to suffer with Roger, eh?! You made my day!!!!!!!!!!

    [Reply]

  18. Now that my back is better; especially as Genius Chris has “enlightened” me on the true meaning of this suffering;(LOL!) fellow Fed fans, Rich,(who doesn’t like long post), please bear with me a few mins, this is off topic but I think it is the right time to say this:

    Dedicated to our dear Ru-an:

    “He is one of those people who makes the world better JUST by being in it”

    Thanks for the birth of this blog,
    which created a diverse and beautiful family out of us, who come in all shapes and sizes.
    Thanks for the excellent analyses, inspirations and assurances,
    that surely made our journey so much more interesting, exciting and memorable.
    Thanks for revealing your soul,
    which made us realise we are not alone,
    and that we can bare ours too.
    And thanks for our daily Ru-an fixes,
    which, like a drug, and an obssession, we can’t do without!

    Celebrating YOU, Ru-an, as we celebrate Fed’s 17th!!!

    Angels watching over you and sending positive vibes from all of us to you, Ru-an, as you TRIUMPH through your set backs!! Keep your chin up! We love you Ru-an! Hugs and kisses!!

    [Reply]

    Ru-an Reply:

    Thanks Veronica that means a lot to me. You are a very special member of this blog.

    [Reply]

  19. Dittos to the above blog by Veronica….Ru-an’s big family, all because of a champion of tennis, called Roger Federer.
    May the family of Ru-an’s Federer blog keep growing!
    Yay…..

    [Reply]

    Ru-an Reply:

    Thanks Dolores. It’s always been a pleasure having you here.Feels like I’ve known you forever!

    [Reply]

  20. I’m thinking back a few years when the media kept asking Roger when he was going to retire. He finally shut them up by proclaiming he planned on playing the Olympics in 2012. A lot of people thought that was a big stretch. Could he possibly be playing that late in his career?
    And now to today…the Wimbledon champion and world #1. Just amazing.
    One more thing. I’ve never really had a problem with Andy Murray. He doesn’t cheat. He cares passionately about tennis. He endured a couple of rough patches in his childhood. And above all, I find his on court antics quite funny and entertaining. He adds to the mix of today’s tennis.
    Great people here on this blog. It’s a pleasure.

    [Reply]

  21. First 1,7,17. Now 2+8+7=17. The numerical symmetry is astounding.

    [Reply]

    V Reply:

    also,this week starting 16-7-12
    1+6+7+1+2=17.Federer is a numbers and Destiny’s man.NO BETTER PROOF

    [Reply]

  22. In the video made by the atp tour, Safin made a statement about Federer, based on his own experience, claiming that he is a mix of both Sampras and Agassi. This statement hit me in the face and made me realize who Federer realy was. He is really the GOAT because he is the real inherinent of tennis history. He is obviously the mix of Sampras and Agassi but he has also the grace of Edberg, the consistency of Lendel, the longevity of Connors, the versatility of Laver, the anger of Macenroe, the attitude of Borg …He his the essence of Tennis history because he loves Tennis and cares and learns from the past and current champions.

    [Reply]

    Kyle Reply:

    The ballstriking of Agassi.
    The fearlessness of Sampras.
    The grace of Edberg.
    The consistency of Lendl.
    The longevity of Connors.
    The versatility of Laver.
    The anger of McEnroe.
    The attitude of Borg.
    Man, that is just beautiful. It is so perfect too because Fed loves the history of tennis like no other and he respects all generations.

    [Reply]

    amine Reply:

    thanks am proud of this one

    [Reply]

    Kyle Reply:

    It’s great because I have never thought of it like that, but Fed really does possess many of the same qualities that all the great champions of the past have had. It makes him even more special, and further backs up the statement that he is the perfect tennis player.

    [Reply]

    amine Reply:

    that’s exactly what am talking about and thats why he is the best athlete maybe ever.

    [Reply]

    rich Reply:

    You left something out. He doesn’t have whatever Nadal has. Does he?

    [Reply]

    amine Reply:

    I was talking about history (Nadal is 5 yaers younger)but since you brought the subject he doesnt have his tics, his bad behavior, his fake humbellness, his bodybulding arms, all he has is his clay court capabilities.

    [Reply]

    rich Reply:

    I guess that’s one way of describing a winning record over Roger.

    [Reply]

    amine Reply:

    you sound like someone deeply hurt when you realize how good Federer is. You have 4 more years of live suffering (at least) and the eternity to read and learn about who Federer was. Why do you read comments on a blog dedicated to a person that you hate. It looks like a mashochits behavior can you explain?

    [Reply]

    rich Reply:

    The only hating going on here is of Nadal. I am no fan of the Spaniard but for years he has had Roger’s number in finals. The writer of this blog has repeatedly referred to him as Roger’s nemesis. Beating Murray doesn’t change that. If you were a little more objective maybe you could see that.

    [Reply]

    amine Reply:

    I was only talking about the history of tennis and Federer’s place in it. Bringing Nadal in the first place was out of subject in this case unless you are a fedhater. The place of Nadal is safe dont worry you dont need to put him in unconfortable comparaisons or discussions

    [Reply]

    rich Reply:

    So Ruan is wrong and a Fedhater when he says Nadal is Roger’s nemesis?

    [Reply]

    amine Reply:

    You are just out of the subject again. I know Nadal is his nemessis (eventhough i think he really only has superior clay court capalities because of his physical defensive game that will not allow him longevity, consistency, versatility, grace…) I did not talk about Nadal at all in my comment. I was only stating that Federer learned and took from all the past greats. Why are focusing so much about Nadal

    [Reply]

    rich Reply:

    You compared Federer to the past greats, saying he is also the best athlete ever. That at least invites comparison with his current competition. There he doesn’t appear to stack up quite so well – if we take Nadal into account. It’s called balance. Unless of course you get to decide what the topic is.

    [Reply]

    amine Reply:

    Do you really think we need a discussion about why federer has a way much better Carrier than nadal as of today

    [Reply]

    rich Reply:

    You keep ducking the issue. You suggest Roger contains attributes from all the great players of the past (and just how many of them have you actually seen?) while rejecting as irrelevant the inconvenient fact that the greatest player ever has a losing record against his main rival, and has often lost matches (including finals) to Nadal he should have won. The Spaniard is in his head (and indeed the author of this blog has often made this very point.) It is a significant blemish on an otherwise unparalleled record. Only someone blinded by fan worship can’t or won’t see that.

    [Reply]

    amine Reply:

    My favorite player ever (prior to Federer) was Edberg. I have been following Connors, Mc Enroe, Willander, Becker, Lendel, Agassi, Samprass… It all started really in the 84 Roland Garros final between Mc Enroe and Lendel (I was also supporting Mc Enroe).
    I think, If you are not a Fedhater, you are obssesed by Nadal and his h2h. This is also a part of Federer resume and greatness but I dont think you are ready to hear and accept such thoughts and explanations eighter because you are traumatised by Nadal (and you really should not be) or you are a Fedhater (I still think that’s what you are)

    [Reply]

    rich Reply:

    Then you get about zero for your powers of comprehension, because the points I expressed have also been made many times previously by Ruan, the author of this blog. So he is obsessed by Nadal and is a secret Fedhater, too?

    [Reply]

    Kyle Reply:

    You mean bad knees? No, Roger does not have bad knees.

    [Reply]

    amine Reply:

    there h2h in withdrawing is largely in favor of nadal

    [Reply]

    rich Reply:

    So is 7 titles to 1 at the French Open.

    [Reply]

    Kyle Reply:

    That’s about all Rafa has over Fed these days. 17>11, 287>102, 75>50, etc….
    And even talking about who’s the better athlete, well, Fed is the one who’s World #1 at 30/31, and Rafa can never seem to stay healthy.

    [Reply]

    rich Reply:

    So if Nadal’s 7 French titles means nothing then why should Roger’s 7 Wimbledon titles mean anything more? Both surfaces count. Sure, Roger is the better all-round player – his greater grand slam tally shows that. But if Nadal is the lesser player (according to a range of criteria you might select) then shouldn’t Roger beat him more often than not when they meet? But the reverse is generally what happens. As much as we might hate to acknowledge it, Nadal has the GOAT’s number. So what if the Spaniard is a poor sport, with innumerable irritating tics and habits and a comparatively graceless way of playing the game; when he meets Federer he generally wins. That is the one great deficiency in any assessment of Roger’s greatness in the history of the sport; he regularly loses to a rival who is arguably an inferior player.

    [Reply]

    amine Reply:

    Where did you read that 7 French titles means nothing? That’s your way of commenting, you start with a false statement and bring the discussion to the same subject (the h2h). You did the same concerning my comment about Tennis history, we start we Edberg grace and we end up in the h2h with Nadal. This is obssession man am serious

    [Reply]

    rich Reply:

    I might be inclined to take some of your comments seriously if you were at least literate, but your inability to spell – your errors litter your posts – says much about the clumsiness generally of your observations. Put as simply as possible, because I realise how much difficulty you have with this, no assessment of Roger’s abilities can leave out his record against his current rivals. Comparison with past greats alone – with only one or two exceptions, he has played against none of them – is purely fanciful. Like your thinking.

    [Reply]

    Kyle Reply:

    Nadal’s 7FOs are as good as Fed’s 7 Wimbledons. But apart from the 7-1 lead in French Opens, Fed leads 4-1 (AO), 5-1 (USO), and 7-2 (Wimby).
    And I’m not going over the stupid H2H thing again. We all know it’s in Rafa’s favour because they have met so many times on clay.

    [Reply]

    rich Reply:

    If the h2h is “stupid”, as you say, then you don’t give Roger credit for his victories over Nadal, either. Clay, is a poor excuse. Roger is a fantastic claycourt player; he has won many clay titles (including the FO) and has even beaten Nadal on clay. But he has also squandered set points and even match points against Nadal on clay. How many of the previous greats mentioned earlier had a losing record against an inferior rival?

    [Reply]

    V Reply:

    rich-if you think that the king of clay is an inferior player on clay,then i have doubts whether you are sane or not

    [Reply]

    Kyle Reply:

    Are you just trying to create an argument here? Yes, Fed is a fantastic clay courter but there is a reason why he loses more to Rafa on clay – because Rafa is better than him on that surface and the advantages Rafa has in their matchup are maximized by the high bounce of the clay and the added effectiveness of Nada’s defending ability. Should Fed have won more clay court matches vs Rafa? Of course. But that he hasn’t is just a testament to how good Rafa is on clay.

    [Reply]

    rich Reply:

    Jeez, we have some sensitive little creatures here, don’t we! I made a one-line comment in response to a lengthy post that suggested Roger was the “greatest athlete ever” and was a composite of all the greatest players in the history of the game (a little over the top in my view.) All these players were unique – just as Roger is. But he isn’t some kind of machine that encompasses everything that came before him.
    So I said (yep, a little provocatively) “he doesn’t have what Nadal has” (and Nadal has surely to rank amongst the greats of the game.) Wow. You’d think I’d just said “there is no God”. And Roger isn’t God, is he? (Or is he? I’m beginning to wonder.)
    And in response to a previous comment, I didn’t say that Nadal is the “inferior claycourt player” – obviously his record says otherwise – but there are titles where Roger more than had his chances against Nadal and didn’t take them. He choked. Nadal was “in his head”, as they say. Very little controversial about that. Furthermore, as far as the losing record against Nadal is concerned, it includes a Wimbledon title and an Australian Open title (and semi-final) and a hardcourt Masters – so it isn’t all about clay.
    Yet if you compare their overall records I would argue that Nadal is not the player Roger is. If you don’t agree that Nadal is ultimately the inferior player then, logically, he is at least the equal of Roger, if not his superior (Nadal is then the GOAT!) I’d be surprised if any of you thought that.

    [Reply]

    Kyle Reply:

    Of course Rafa isn’t the player Roger is. But Davydenko has a winning record against Nadal, and he’s not the player Rafa is either.

    [Reply]

    rich Reply:

    And Haas has lately a “winning” record against Roger, after beating him in the final at Halle, where they last met. This argument is capable of becoming aburd. Davydenko is not in the same league as Roger and Nadal, and is not a rival to either. So are you trying to say Roger’s win-loss record against Nadal (and more importantly, in my view, how he lost – when he squandered leads and break chances) says nothing? Check out Ruan’s latest post. He describes Nadal (who must be seen as Roger’s chief rival in his career) as “Roger’s nemesis”. It isn’t just about surfaces. I rest my case.

    [Reply]

    Kyle Reply:

    When have I ever said Nadal wasn’t his biggest rival?

    [Reply]

    rich Reply:

    Straw man – I didn’t say you did. But you compared Davydenko and Nadal, and Davydenko is nobody’s main rival, while Nadal is certainly Federer’s. Clearly, that was a red herring. But rather than waste your time nit-picking with me why don’t you tell Ruan that he is wrong, because what I am saying he has long-maintained on this blog, and has even reiterated in his latest post? But I’m picking you won’t do that.

    [Reply]

  23. BIG NEWS EVERYONE.NADAL IS OFFICIALLY OUT OF LONDON OLYMPIC GAMES.
    Nadal on missing Olympics: “Today is one of the saddest days of my career.”.Well this is a very sad news to the tennis freternities.Well I hope that this des not deter the quality of tennis at the olympics.Even though I am not a Nadal fan,I pray that he recovers quickly because tennis needs him.ALLEZ ROGER
    ALWAYS

    [Reply]

  24. Hi everyone! Like V, I just heard the news. I’m no Nadal hater although I don’t like him; and I try to ignore the drug implications. But it gets very uncomfortable. Anyone here thinks maybe reason Nadal withdrew because of the stringent olympic drug testing? Why suddenly the bad knees after FO when he was running like a rabbit and seem so well? And now, without giving too much detail, he is withdrawing from olympics. Doesn’t seem to smell right : the cycles, the insinuations/accusations (so far no solid evidence)he gets, the shadiness of it all. Like V, I hope he still has few years competition left in him. I don’t want to read about Fed taking advantage every time Nadal does not appear. And like Rich, I wanna see Fed beat him fair and square. Fed is in good mental form now and it is the right time to meet Nadal. Wish Nadal speedy recovery.

    [Reply]

    rich Reply:

    We should trust Nadal explanations like we should believe O.J. when he says he didn’t do it. Whatever. For Roger, another Olympic gold beckons.

    [Reply]

    veronica Reply:

    LOL! Rich. I like your intelligent and roundabout kinda sense of humour. I don’t think you are a Fed hater as Amine suggested. Rather, I think you are a stong Fed fan and you have been very frustrated with how Fed folded over to Nadal and some close matches to other players these last couple years. The frustration is piled on more when you suspect in your heart of hearts that Nadal is not clean but yet prove is not forthcoming anytime at all. But being an intelligent and level-headed person, you are able to turn the negative energy into something positive : making witty and dry comments and sometimes with a twist! I am a fan of your comments.

    [Reply]

    rich Reply:

    Thank you, Veronica. It’s true, I am a little “twisted”. After Nadal, let’s see if Ferrer, too, pulls out of the Olympics. A few days ago Nadal was saying his knees were fine after yet another of his miraculous PRP injections. Did he looked injured at Paris, Queens or Wimbledon? Something has put the wind up the Spaniard. Out of cycle, perhaps? Testing looking a little too tough this year? I’ll bet you he’ll be back to normal (whatever that is for him) at the USO. He won’t be missed in London.

    [Reply]

    Chris Reply:

    Rich is advocating for a more balanced, fair approach when comparing the Beauty with the Beast. Since I have regularly expressed my suspicions about Nadal superhuman stamina, it is therefore only fair to say that there is also some people out there saying that it’s completely the other way round: http://federerisdoping.blogspot.com/?m=1, just google federerisdoping. Have a good laugh!

    [Reply]

    Wilfried Reply:

    I had the same thought.
    It is perhaps better to just go by what Nadal tells about it instead of start looking for an hidden agenda behind Nadal’s decision to withdraw from the Olympics.
    The most plausible explanation imo is simply that Nadal needs more time for his knees to heal and that he doesn’t want to risk his long-term health.
    Btw if he really had been running fast like bunny rabbit in the 2r of last Wimbledon edition, he probably wouldn’t have lost to journeyman Lukas Rosol.

    [Reply]

    Wilfried Reply:

    I had the same thought.
    It is perhaps better to just go by what Nadal tells about it instead of start looking for an hidden agenda behind Nadal’s decision to withdraw from the Olympics.
    The most plausible explanation imo is simply that Nadal needs more time for his knees to heal and that he doesn’t want to risk his long-term health.
    Btw if he really had been running fast like bunny rabbit in the 2r of last Wimbledon edition, he probably wouldn’t have lost to journeyman Lukas Rosol.

    [Reply]

    rich Reply:

    Rosol may be a journeyman 364 days of the year but on that day he didn’t let Nadal run like a rabbit. He hit him off the court. You gotta ask yourself how is it that the most injured player in the history of the sport is also one of the most successful. I would love to be that injured.

    [Reply]

    steve Reply:

    If one “goes by what Nadal tells” in his official autobiography, in 2005 he was diagnosed with a congenital bone defect in his foot that threatened his career, and that the situation was so dire that he considered switching to golf!

    http://www.tennis.com/articles/templates/news.aspx?articleid=13806

    Still, his lowest point seems to have been when doctors discovered a congenital bone problem in the bridge of his left foot soon after a five-set victory over Ivan Ljubicic in Madrid on his toughest indoor surface.

    Nadal said that joy was soon replaced by “a state of deepest gloom.”

    “(The) diagnosis had initially been like a shot to the head,” Nadal writes. “The bone still hurts me. It remains under control, just, but we can never drop our guard.”

    Nadal wept then, just as he did after losing the 2007 Wimbledon final to Federer.

    Since then, he has won 10 major titles, including the Career Grand Slam, and the Olympic gold medal, as well as the most Masters titles in history.

    So you tell me how “threatened” his career has been by this congenital problem–which is totally separate from the chronic knee problems which appear and then suddenly disappear.

    One could believe him, of course. But I would sooner believe that the sun rises in the west and sets in the east than I would believe him.

    [Reply]

  25. More provocative thoughts about Nadal’s withdrawal:
    1)Could Nadal be wary of being “Rosoled” again? Nadal still hadn’t adapted to grass properly this year. He’s a player who needs to play a lot to get in form. Olympics is best of 3 – no time to adapt or to play yourself in form. Risk is very high to get knocked out. Maybe more astute to protect against another potential embarrassment?
    2) He already has a gold. Moreover, there’s only 750 points for grabs; not much in the big picture as he is already far behind Fed and Djoko. He’s more concerned about chasing Fed’s slam records. Let Fed and Djoko sweat it out in Olympics
    3) By skipping Olympics, he has ample time to prepare for hard court season. I suspect he is going all out to make an assault there and especially aiming for USO. Again, let Fed and Djoko exhaust themselves playing everything.
    4) He will again do the Asian swing although he complains about long season; can’t resist the money on offer there.
    5)Conclusion : A very smart and strategic move by Nadal. If any of it is true, Fed better be VERY ready for Nadal when he appears at USO. We have seen what Nadal can do in USO 2010

    [Reply]

    TD Reply:

    Agree with all your points. I would just add that Nadal is still in the race for #1 ranking in the end of the year. Like Federer and Djokovic, he can still earn more points in the upcoming months. As long as he still has a chance to get the top ranking spot, I think we will see him perform better even this upcoming fall season.
    There’s a good chance that the final ranking order for this season will be decided in the WTF.

    [Reply]

  26. One more thought. Fed is playing so well now, Nadal knows he has no chance unless he himself is top form. So avoid The Mighty Fed at all costs!! I’ve always felt although Nadal is very comfortable playing Fed and is confident against Fed, he doesn’t like it one bit when Fed beats him. And his h2h record against Fed is one, I believe, he is MIGHTY proud of because he can claim he owns the greatest player who ever lived and the h2h helps him in his cause to be GOAT in the future. I think he doesn’t like the feeling of helplessness which Fed makes a player feel once he goes into unplayable mode. No evidence here but I really belive Nadal is scared of meeting Fed right now; not scared per se; but scared that he is not in top shape to win against an unplayable Fed.

    [Reply]

  27. Me too I enjoy your comment, Rich. As for Nadal, I don’t know if I qualify as a hater, but I really struggle to feel symphathy, unlike my feelings for Murray or Roddick at a given moment.

    [Reply]

  28. SOmeone help me with this.Roger did not recieve poitns for his Rotterdam and Dubai victories and NAdal did not recieve points for his Barcelona Defence victory.I heard that these will be added somewhere next week.SO is this true or just a rumor coz this could give Roger a big boost over Novak in the rankings and make life easier for him to retain the year end no1 without going allout at all the tournaments

    [Reply]

    steve Reply:

    The list of all of the tournaments that count towards Federer’s current ranking is here:

    http://www.atpworldtour.com/tennis/players/top-players/roger-federer.aspx?t=rb

    This list is changed whenever they recalculate the rankings (happens slightly less than once a week, approximately 45 times a year).

    Each time they calculate the rankings, all Grand Slam results and the results of the 8 mandatory Masters 1000 in the previous 52 weeks are counted (in addition to Monte Carlo, which is the only non-mandatory Masters).

    For the rest of the points, they count the best six results in 500/250 level tournaments over the previous 52 weeks.

    Rotterdam and Dubai are currently counted, and will be until next year.

    As far as 500 level tournaments left this year, Federer will only be playing Basel, where he is defending champion with 500 points. So he can’t gain any more points from the 500 level tournaments than he already has.

    He won’t be playing any more 250 level tournaments this year; Halle and Doha were the only ones.

    So he cannot add any points from those levels of tournaments at all during the rest of this season.

    This is why these Olympics are doubly important for Federer; not only to make history by winning a gold medal in singles at Wimbledon, but to extend his tenuous 75-point lead over Djokovic.

    [Reply]

    V Reply:

    Yeah thanks steve.i toltally forgot about the six best results.Thanks for taking the effort to post it over here anyways.
    V

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  29. Rafa’s success at the USO will depend on his health. He will surely be motivated, but as we know, he needs match play to get into rhythm, and with these injury problems, he might not get that much match play in Toronto and Cincy. Sure, you can say Rafa could come back on fire and play like he did at the USO in 2010, but he was healthy AND confident that year. He will be much less so this year after losing early at Wimbledon and not being able to defend his gold medal.

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    jason Reply:

    Rafa’s health depends on how his match progresses:

    1.If he loses, it means the injury is serious.

    2. If he wins in a difficult way / on the verge of losing, he is nursing an injury — and the trainers may come in handy.

    3.If he wins against a great player (Djoko/Rog), he won’t talk about it…he will talk humbly to induce people’s admiration, “Oh, what a humble & classy champion.”

    NO PLAYERS, I mean ABSOLUTELY NONE… ever beats him when he’s in good condition. Right.

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    Dave Reply:

    You want to lay off the hooka pipe bro. Nadal is a big baby. I think he’s nursing a badly bruised ego rather than his sore knee.

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