Federer vs Clement Highlights, Nadal Passes Another Tough Test

Above you can find some points in the Clement/Federer match. There is no full highlights on youtube.

Today Nadal was in action against Petszchner and again he was 2 sets to 1 down, only to come back to win it 6-4, 4-6, 6-7, 6-2, 6-3. It was pretty much the same story as against Haase. Neither Haase nor Petszchner could keep up their level of play long enough to beat Nadal. Nadal is just mentally and physically stronger than these guys, and we must respect that. At 2-2 in the fourth set Nadal called for the trainer, and right after that he broke Petszchner. Nadal does seem to do this kind of thing a lot when he falls behind. I never paid much attention to it but it does look suspect after this match. Nadal also got a warning for receiving coaching from uncle Toni. He is obviously not the classy and fair player that Federer is, but still I feel like players should not allow Nadal’s mind games to get to them. They should be prepared for it and either counter with something of their own or block it out.

I realize this may be a moral dilemma for Roger, who does not want to go down to Nadal’s levels, but if I recall correctly he did just that in the Madrid final last year. If you play competitive sports you should expect these kind of things to happen and find a way to deal with it. Anyway Nadal is looking vulnerable at this point. He now plays Mathieu, and should he win there, he could well run into Soderling. Soderling has to beat Ferrer, which should not be very hard for him at all. If Nadal and Soderling meets, Nadal may just be in trouble. Soderling is a step up from guys like Haase and Petszchner. He plays a similar game but he is better and he is more experienced. I think Soderling is already drooling over a rematch with Nadal to avenge the French Open loss. This is a match that I really hope will happen because it will make for terrific viewing.


I like the match up because Soderling does not fall for Nadal’s games. He is very much an in-your-face kind of guy himself which is why he has given Nadal problems in the past. Other than Soderling and Nadal, Murray and Tsonga won as well, and they will be facing Querry and Benneteau respectively in the next round. So everything still points to a Soderling/Nadal, Murray/Tsonga quarter final in the bottom half of the draw. Tomorrow Roger will be on first on center court against Melzer. What I find strange is that Nadal and Murray is also playing their fourth round matches today, as well as Roddick and Djokovic. Berdych on the other hand is not playing. Not sure what’s up with that scheduling. It makes for good viewing anyway. The matches I am most interested in is Roger’s match and Djokovic against Hewitt. That could well be the most competitive match of the fourth round.

I’d like to see Hewitt win, but it could go either way. I hope Roger wins in straight sets tomorrow or at most in 4 sets. I think you can expect a result in that vicinity. We have reached the half way mark now and it’s time for Roger to send a clear message to the rest of the field.

Tomorrow’s OOP: http://www.wimbledon.org/en_GB/scores/schedule/index.html

Roger Federer
Please click HERE. Thank you.

Ps. I obviously completely failed to take into account that there is no play on Sunday at Wimbledon. An unnecessary tradition if you ask me. All round of 16 matches will be played on Monday.

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31 Comments

  1. I tot it was cheeky of Roger to make Rafa wait instead at last year’s Madrid. Of course King Fed don’t like to stoop that low to play mind games, he holds such high respect for tennis. It would be interesting for OTHER players to distrupt his OCD ritual. I’d like to see Soderling doing that. Btw does anyone has snippets of Rafa receiving warning for alleged coaching?

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  2. I am a big Roger fan, but also liked Nadal who I thought was very humble, but after watching his match yesterday vs. Petzschner I no longer like him! Nadal clearly won through deceitfulness, making use of injury timeouts to upset the focus of his opponent.
    How could anyone even compare him to Roger! That was unsportsmanlike behavior!
    I beg to disagree with people who think Nadal is greater than Fed simply because he has the better record in their match ups. Rafa is merely an “Achilles Heel” for Roger. Roger is great but only human. So just because Nadal has beaten Roger more times does not make him greater! Roger has achieved much and has done so with elegant grace and style! He is the greatest tennis player ever!

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  3. Nadal is losing and Oh surprise! his injury appears…
    P.Petchsner in his interview says:”I felt like he was still running the same for 5 sets.And I think he could run another 2 or 3 .He´s moving great around in the court.So I have no idea.”
    I´m sure Roger could beat Nadal but he fears him, that´s why he respects him, and that´s why I can´t stand
    Nadal´s behaviour.(Toni is always coaching him).

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    Dragos Reply:

    I have to disagree with you because I don’t really think that Roger fears Nadal. I am sure that deep in his hart Roger is not liking Nadal’s wish to win no matter the cost. If there is only one that can overpass, mentally, Nadal’s tricks that one is Roger and I am expecting him to do it sooner or latter. Better sooner if possible :-) . Or, If I am thinking a bit more and I am sure that this scenario is better: I would enjoy more that Nadal’s “brightness and power” is long time history while Roger is still playing and wining majors.

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  4. When Nadal had the tendinitis many people said his career was over. And when he made clay-slam many said he was totally cured. Neither of these are true, and yes Nadal is troubled by his knees now. It is expected since it has been almost a year after his treatment. When you look at Ferrer and Gonzalez, who also have tendinitis in their knee (or Del Potro and his wrist), you can see they have to take rest several times in a year, and they also retire from matches or take injury timeouts, because they have to (Gonzalez is almost the same case with Nadal). The thing is Nadal is not as bad as he was in 2009 now, because he took care of himself better this year. I think he is planning to finish Wimbledon in a decent way to get a treatment afterwards, this is what he said in his presser (there is also more info about his left-knee injury in Miami and a new treatment which sounds promising for players like Gonzalez and Del Potro). He has nothing to lose in Wimbledon, he is not in a good shape and I guess he does think that he is not going to win it this year.
    And about the injury timeout, i don’t think it came at a time that Petzschner had the momentum. Before the time out 3 games were played. In 2 Nadal service games Petzschner could only win 1 point but in the Petzschner serve Nadal had 2 break points. Petzschner was in trouble and he clearly didn’t had the momentum at that moment. So it is more reasonable to think that Nadal was really injured. No player would stop the game after having 2 break point opportunities and serving a lovegame just after that. He has a chronic injury and he has to take timeouts in some matches. It is not like he takes timeouts in every 5 setter, he didn’t take any when he won Aussie Open in 2009, because at that time he was playing right after his treatment he took at the end of 2008 and he was fine. And if people are questioning Nadal’s timeout, they should also question Petzschner’s which was taken when Nadal clearly had the momentum.
    About the coaching Petzschner himself said he didn’t think there was any coaching going on.

    http://www.sportinglife.com/tennis/wimbledon2010/news/story_get.cgi?STORY_NAME=wimbledon/10/06/26/WIMBLEDON_Nadal_Nightlead.html

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    Ru-an Reply:

    The time out was taken in the fourth when Petz led 2-1 in sets and there were no breaks. In the next game Nadal broke. He also still moved incredibly well. So i think its very possible he did it to throw Petz off. He always seems to be injured when he loses.

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    PRENDON Reply:

    I completely agree.

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    k Reply:

    Hey, thank you!

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  5. You may say he always seems to be injured when he loses , or he seems to lose when he is injured. It just depends on the way you look. Everyone knows Nadal is injury-prone, he has chronic tendinitis, it is quite normal that he gets injured. Petzschner was leading 2-1 in the sets but Nadal didn’t take timeout right after the end of 3rd set. At that time Petzschner had the momentum. They played 3 games, and on those 3 games Nadal was way better then Petzschner. Again, i repeat, no player would get a fake timeout when they just had 2 break point opportunities on opponents serve and they deliver a lovegame rigth after that. Nadal seemed to move well, but he moves well when he can ignore the pain. I think his situation is not much different from second half of 2008. He has pain and he is trying to deal with it, but is still able to move well. The only time he couldn’t move well was before French Open 2009 and at that time people were saying he would not last another 3 years with those knees, he was way over the limits. The difference from 2008 is he is more careful now, which is understandable after what he faced in 2009. The guy is just 24, and what he dealt until today is too much for his age i think. The fear he faces when he feels a pain, and need of a relief he will get with a massage is understandable.
    And what about Petzshner’s timeout? Was it fake too? If it wasn’t how do we know that?

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    Ru-an Reply:

    What does it matter he had 2 bp opportunities? It just shows his inability to break. Petz’s timeout was a reaction to Nadals i think, but at that point it was too late. He was more an act of desperation.

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    k Reply:

    I still think “being unable to convert break points” is a lot better than “not even getting close to have break points”..Because sooner or later you’ll get one of those, like Nadal did in 4th and 5th set. Petzschner on the other hand, had no chance at all..

    I also think Petzschner was not faking his timeout. He was tired, he could be injured. Too bad his timeout came at a time when Nadal had the momentum, but he did what he had to do and Nadal should deal with it, and he did.

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    Ru-an Reply:

    You cant say Petz had no chance at all. Thats just wrong. He was up 2-1 in sets. I think we should just agree to disagree at this point.

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    k Reply:

    I said at the moment when Nadal received treatment he was not able to break Nadal. 9/1 receving rate tells it so.

    And on Sunday Nadal made a practise for just 40 minutes. If he is not injured, why does he break his momentum?

    http://sports.yahoo.com/tennis/news?slug=ap-wimbledon-nadal

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    steve Reply:

    The tennis media are starting to ask questions. Pat McEnroe and Boris Becker wondered aloud whether Nadal was playing games with the injury timeouts. You pull the same trick one too many times, people are gonna get wise to you.

    Nadal is so used to the tennis media treating him like a little boy and indulging his compulsive on-court behavior and making excuses for him whenever he loses. Now he has to act like an adult and he doesn’t like it.

    The media savaged Federer after he lost Wimbledon. They called him a has-been, said he should retire, that he was too arrogant and self-absorbed to change. Federer dealt with it.

    The media savaged Djokovic for quitting in Grand Slam matches. Djokovic dealt with it.

    The media savaged Murray because they wanted a British Grand Slam winner and they tore him down relentlessly whenever he lost. Murray dealt with it.

    Now the media is just raising an eyebrow at Nadal’s behavior–after so many years of praising his modesty and virtue and taking everything he does at face value–and does Nadal deal with it?

    No, he freaks out.

    He hasn’t experienced a fraction of the brutal treatment the players I mentioned did, and instead of handling it with grace and composure he gets angry.

    Frankly it’s been a long time coming.

    He is 24 years old, world #1, and a seven-time Grand Slam champ. Someone in his position can’t act like a helpless child and expect to be taken seriously.

    You think the ump made one bad call? Man up and take it, instead of freaking out on-court and then bitching about it in the press conference.

    There’s this deep sense of persecution and victimhood among Nadal and his fans. “Oh, the world is against poor little Rafa! His victories are worth ten times more than everyone else’s victories because everyone’s against him and he has to fight so hard! He’s the only one who has to face this much adversity! No one in the history of tennis has ever had to overcome as many obstacles to win!” etc. etc.

    The world is not going to end if Soderling mocks how long you take to serve or if some umpire thinks you’re taking on-court coaching. It’s not personal. Deal with it.

    Oh yeah, and where he says he had “problems” with injury when he lost to Roddick in Miami? Great sportsmanship, eh? Can’t he just admit he lost to the better man on the day, and not try to delegitimize Roddick’s well-earned victory?

    I could write volumes more, but it’d get pretty mean and this post is already way too long.

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    Ru-an Reply:

    Lol…

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    Dragos Reply:

    I totally agree with you Steve and I am glad you stopped before getting meaner. I want myself to have the meanest comments about “poor little Rafa” :-) .

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  6. “He is 24 years old, world #1, and a seven-time Grand Slam champ. Someone in his position can’t act like a helpless child and expect to be taken seriously. You think the ump made one bad call? Man up and take it, instead of freaking out on-court and then bitching about it in the press conference. ”

    So how do you explain a 15-time slam winner, #1 and 28 year old player to get fined 10.000$ for using bad language in a slam final? By the way Nadal talked in press conference because he was asked about the issue. And i don’t remember him getting fined for bad language, as he does not use any.

    People just get mad when there is a misjudgement. That is the fact. Federer is right to get way angry if there was a misjudgement. And so is Nadal.

    About Roddick match, months passed after that.. If he needed an excuse for his loss, he would tell it right after the match. Now, no one cares what hapenned there. He also told he was injured in Monte-Carlo, the tournament he demolished everyone, so he implies he still can win when he is injured. The thing is none of his matches in Monte-Carlo went long enough to make his quadriceps tightened there, so he didn’t need a timeout. So the injury does not sound like an excuse to me at all.

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    Dragos Reply:

    June, sometimes when two people don’t like each other, even if we are talking about people coming from different cultures and with different level of education and different financial status, is just bad chemistry. And in this case is not necessarily that both person not to like each other from the beginning. I don’t like Nadal and I am sure that this “rejection” is strong enough for making him not to like me either. I can live with that and still be happy.
    I agree that Nadal is a hard working athlete that wants to be number one in tennis and for now he is. But to consider him as a model and to start supporting him when he wants so badly to win, even when he is using unfair methods, is just the reflection of a society that lost the last drop of its real values. In the end both Roger and Nadal are just tennis players. To transform them both, or one of them, in a model for us adults or, even worse, for children it is from my point of view a big mistake. I can appreciate the fighting spirit of Nadal and I can also like or dislike his or Roger’s attitude during a match but at the end of the day is just another form of “panem et circenses” in order to distract people from their real problems. It is something that I don’t really want to do anymore. If I need models I have plenty of them in the real life…
    Sorry if I bothered anyone but in the end liking or disliking one tennis player is not going to pay my bills during this life and is not going to be a solid defense when I will be in front of the Judge at my personal judgment day after death.

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    k Reply:

    Liking or not liking somenone is a different issue. The thing is when a player with a chronic injury is accused of faking an injury based on absolutely “nothing” i think that it is biased and unfair. I think neither Nadal nor Petzschner faked an injury. People should give more credit to tennis players and be more reasonable about the problems they face. It’s not like they are playing only a few matches.

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    Dragos Reply:

    Dear K,

    I think your parents have had a very hard time to register your birth under this very short name K. As a matter of fact is not even a capital is just a plain k. Dragos is my given name so at least you know that you are talking to a person (those that know Romanian also know that it is a male name).
    Despite this starting attack I want to tell you that this was exactly my point, liking or disliking is a different issue, but I wanted to put it in another paradigm or other reference if you like.
    By the way this was a Roger Federer fan page and even you like it or not some of us have other criteria in liking or disliking human beings, attitudes, activities etc. This also includes sport stars, pop stars, movie stars, or every fabricated stars that are shining so much that we cannot see their flaws and even if we see the flaws we are forced by other fellow worshipers to change our attitude. Ru-an can very easy ban my comments if he totally disagree with me and I will gladly ready to accept it if he decides to do so.
    Nadal was anyhow going to win. It is something that always happens in these cases so why faking? And on the other hand who is forcing him to run after EVERY ball? It looks like he desperately WANTS to get injured. This is not a good example for people because for me it looks like a lack of judgment. After all he is not playing only a few matches…

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    Ru-an Reply:

    ‘I think your parents have had a very hard time to register your birth under this very short name K. As a matter of fact is not even a capital is just a plain k’ :lol:

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    k Reply:

    “think your parents have had a very hard time to register your birth under this very short name K. As a matter of fact is not even a capital is just a plain k.”

    Aawww..Too bad it took you several attempts to get that.. :D ..

    Keep up the good work!

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    k Reply:

    By the way tendinitis is not something he gets by running. Check out this link

    http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=267319

    Many other players like Gonzalez have tendinitis, and they do not run that much. Also even Bollettieri told Nadal is what he is, no one can change him, and he is not being coached in a wrong way. He tring his best to deal with his situation.

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    Dragos Reply:

    Dear k,
    Sorry to bother you but definitely you belong elsewhere. As I told you my criteria in deciding what I like and what I don’t like are very different than yours. I don’t like tendinitis for example because I have this problem myself so I don’t need to read a link in order to know that is extremely painful and despite the treatments that I tried is still there. About running you are definitely right that running in a park or on a fitness running machine is not going to give you this problem. Still on a tennis court “running” is a bit more complex, just a bit. I am trying to translate an expression from my own language in order to give you a clear image about the complexity of this “running” on the court: “like a testicle in a bucket”. Acceleration, deceleration, very fast change of direction, positioning and all this in fractions of seconds is clear that a man of 85 – 90 kg as is Nadal is not going to even notice the difference between running in the park and running in a tennis court, during a tennis match…

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  7. Gotta love how the automatic response to criticism of Nadal is “But Federer did something which I think was worse.” Can’t you stick to the topic at hand?

    But OK, if you want to talk about that, Federer cursed in response to the umpire’s attitude, rather than the call–he told Federer to “be quiet”, it’s understandable that Federer might take offense at being told to shut up, though perhaps not excusable that he cursed. He got annoyed for about ten seconds, and he paid the fine. He didn’t complain about the umpire afterwards to the authorities; he shrugged, accepted it, and said “It is what it is.”

    And he lost the match, which would have made it more likely for him to be pissed. Nadal ended up winning his match and he was STILL pissed, like he took personal offense, and insisted he would take his case to the authorities.

    “And i don’t remember him getting fined for bad language, as he does not use any.”

    He doesn’t get fined because he doesn’t curse in English. He does his cursing in Spanish. He’s said plenty of naughty things like “Hijo de puta” on court. Cleverly exploiting the language barrier to avoid being punished.

    To be fair, he’s not the only player who takes care to curse in a foreign language to get around the rules, I’m pretty sure Safin did too, for instance. But Nadal is not some innocent naif who never dreamed of saying a dirty word. He curses too.

    “About Roddick match, months passed after that.. If he needed an excuse for his loss, he would tell it right after the match.”

    He didn’t have to. His uncle did it for him a short while after the match, in an interview with Spanish-language media:

    http://www.gototennisblog.com/2010/04/07/del-potro-simon-soderling-out-of-monte-carlo-nadal-knee-advisory/

    This is how Nadal keeps his hands clean. His uncle plays the bad guy and says all the unsportsmanlike things Nadal can’t. That way Nadal can play the innocent by saying “It wasn’t me who said that, it was Uncle Toni, and I don’t have control over him.” Politicians call this “plausible deniability.”

    Now, of course, Nadal himself lets it slip months afterwards.

    Just like after FO, Toni Nadal got on a radio show and gave a rant which was a more extreme version of Nadal’s remarks I quoted above:

    Toni Nadal said there was some truth to the phrase: “There is only one set of supporters that is worse than the French and that is the Parisians.”

    “They say it themselves and it’s true, the Parisian crowd is pretty stupid. I think the French don’t like it when a Spaniard wins,” he added. “Wanting someone to lose is a slightly conceited way of amusing yourself. They show the stupidity of people who think themselves superior.”

    It’s not coincidence. Does Nadal consciously plot this strategy with his uncle? Doubt it. But he probably deliberately overlooks what his uncle says and his uncle just as deliberately says the things he knows Nadal feels but doesn’t publicly express.

    Because Toni is family, it’s seen as an uncle showing avuncular concern for his nephew, instead of what it is: just another case of a coach spouting BS to protect his player’s rep.

    If Larry Stefanki were interviewed and said “Andy was feeling an elbow twinge when he lost to Roger at Wimbledon” everyone would roll their eyes just a little bit. But when Toni says things about the knees everyone goes, “Ah, he’s the uncle, he must know something, he wouldn’t say this if he weren’t really worried about his nephew.” And don’t think Toni Nadal doesn’t know this dynamic and exploit it; he’s a smart man and he understands how to play the media to his player’s advantage.

    Again I could go on, but I’ve written plenty.

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    k Reply:

    Toni commented after Miami because Nadal caught hitting his knees during the match and that flared up diccussions in Spanish media. He commented to sush people. And i must say Toni Nadal and Rafael Nadal are two different people, they may disagree and act differently. The thing is Toni is Nadal’s uncle so he can not oppose to him easily like other people.
    The kind of bad language he uses is used by many other player. He did not use a bad language against a person. Even in his own language he doesn’t curse to people, but things (The words he uses are not masculine).
    Yes Federer did not complain after the US Open final because he was wrong. He had nothing in his defence after what he had done. Nadal is going to speak with supervisors because he has a point. If he was wrong, he wouldn’t. And i brought about the subject just to say the age, the number of titles and ranking has nothing to do with getting angry during a match. It was not an automathic response i was just making a point. If it was an automatic response i could write more and more..
    Toni Nadal complains about French crowd. He can, it’s his opinion. The way he talked about French crowd hardly helps Nadal. Also I recommend you to look at Nadal – Grosjean match in 2005, you would have a better idea why Toni doesn’t like them.

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    steve Reply:

    “The thing is Toni is Nadal’s uncle so he can not oppose to him easily like other people.”

    If Nadal feels his uncle is misrepresenting him, he should take him aside and tell him so. That’s what a man does. What you’re describing is the behavior of a scared little boy, who’s too gutless to do the right thing.

    He had courage enough to yell at the ump who made the call and lather himself into a frenzy of righteous outrage, but he can’t talk to his own uncle about his career?

    That’s just the behavior of a bully. Pick on someone less powerful then him, but cower before someone stronger.

    It’s a big stretch to think he’s unaware of what Uncle Toni says. Since he’s never made any public move to repudiate Toni’s remarks, we have to assume he tacitly approves of them.

    “Yes Federer did not complain after the US Open final because he was wrong. He had nothing in his defence after what he had done.”

    Of course he could have complained. He thought the ump was allowing Del Potro too much time on challenges. That’s certainly legitimate grounds to file an official complaint. The cursing has nothing to do with that.

    But he didn’t file a complaint about the ump’s judgment, because he realized it was not worth it. The ump made one bad call, it’s not a reason to go to the authorities. Life goes on.

    Not Nadal, though. If things don’t go exactly the way he thinks they should, everything has to come to a stop while he gets personal satisfaction.

    “The words he uses are not masculine”

    Do you even have the faintest idea what you’re talking about? In Spanish, nouns are either of male or female gender. There is no neuter gender. And “hijo”–‘son’ in English–is most definitely masculine.

    “Hijo de puta” is a curse. Sorry if that shatters your precious image of innocent little Rafa who always is a good boy and who’s never had a naughty thought, but that’s the way it is.

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  8. How convenient! “Hijo de puta” in Spanish is not “son of a bitch” in English… What you see and hear is not true it is just a monstrous conspiracy against the best nephew of the worst uncle in the whole world.
    By the way somebody should call the Spanish Academy and tell them to change the gender of the word “hijo” from masculine in neutral as Rafael Nadal is refering to this word as neutral (it is true that in Latin originated languages things and objects are mostly neutral gender).
    And yes Spanish people are the most altruistic, kind and funny persons that I ever met :D . That is why after winning against Nadal in Madrid in 2006 Berdych (who is part of the above mentioned conspiracy) showed the “shush” sign to Spanish crowd – that were in fact all of them French people trying to show to the world that there is no difference between French and Spanish tennis crowds and Toni Nadal is not right. Comments of THE UNCLE of the century are looking to me like a piece of glass that is laughing about a broken window.

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