Doha Draw

http://www.atpworldtour.com/posting/2012/451/mds.pdf

I hope you all had a fun new year’s eve and have a blessed new year. After Roger’s fantastic end to 2011 there were a lot of enthusiasm and hope for 2012. I have to admit I’m still a bit shocked at how much people have made of Roger’s performance in the exho. I feel like he deserves more than that from his fans. An exho is a glorified practice session and very little should be read into it indeed, especially for Roger. I guess it shows how much expectations some of his fans still have for him. What if he fails those expectations? How would we feel then? Not very good I can promise you. The less you expect the less you have to lose. So everyone got their expectations up after the indoor season, but I warned people that outdoors is an altogether different ballgame. Indoor tennis should not be taken as a measure for Roger’s form.

I think fans are too emotional. They get all excited when Roger has a good indoor season and then when he loses in a meaningless exho they move to the opposite side of the spectrum. Geez. Can’t we just lower our expectations a bit and enjoy what is left of this GOAT’s career? I’m not saying you should not have any expectations at all. That takes the fun out of it as well. Just accept that Roger is not in his prime anymore and lower your expectations somewhat. I promise you it will be worth your while. Then he can pleasantly surprise you, instead of deeply disappointing you. I learned this last year. I had high hopes for Roger at the Australian Open and Wimbledon, and I ended up disappointed, as well as on several other occasions. It just doesn’t make the Fedfan experience much fun. It starts to bring you down.

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On the other hand I didn’t have much expectations for Roger at the French and US Open. And then he played some fantastic tennis. With a bit of luck he could have won one of those slams. Lets just give the guy a break. He has given us so much throughout the years. Lets not be greedy. If he then wins a slam it will be a huge bonus. For me just seeing him play well and the excitement of him being a contender at a slam is enough. I know it’s not fun when he plays badly, but that makes the times he plays well more rewarding as well. In his prime he was always playing well, and it was hard to really appreciate what we were seeing. Now there is some more contrast and we can appreciate his best level a bit more. Also for me it helps to take interest in what goes on at the top of the game. The rivalries at the top of the game I find interesting.

Now lets move on to Doha. I just felt like I wanted to get that off my chest before we head into this new season. Roger will play Davydenko is the first round on Tuesday I think. He won’t play tomorrow. Some Fedfans are worried about Roger’s chances after the exho. Davydenko is clearly not the same player he was at the end of 2010 and beginning of 2011 when he beat Nadal in Doha. I mean his level has really dropped off. So I’m not too worried. Having said that Roger must make sure that he wins this. Losing in the first round won’t be great for his confidence going into Melbourne. If he beats Davydenko the exho will all of a sudden be forgotten and Roger will look good for a semi-final spot. Looking at his draw he should in fact get at least three wins under his belt, because he doesn’t have really tough competition until the semis.

In the semis he can meet Tsonga once again, which is getting a bit ridiculous. Losing to Tsonga won’t be so bad though. The main thing is to get some competitive matches under his belt before Melbourne. I have already said that I would actually prefer he loses in the semis or final here to take some pressure off himself. But I do feel he needs to get a few wins under his belt and just show people how little the exho meant.

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29 Comments

  1. Ruan, how much should we lower our expectations? Roger is world no.3 and has just won the end of year championships after a superb late season run. Sure, the results of an exho don’t count as they would in a regular tournament but they are still matches – they are not a session on the practice court. Being thrashed in consecutive matches by his two main rivals is not pretty to watch. “Flying under the radar” simply means Roger’s form is lousy. Personally, I don’t find that encouraging.

    [Reply]

    Ru-an Reply:

    So you think his form at the FO and USO was lousy?

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    neil Reply:

    No, I don’t. But Djokovic was certainly out to make a statement at Abu Dhabi, after his slide in form at the end of last year. Correspondingly, what was Roger trying to tell us? That he is still on holiday? If he didn’t care then he shouldn’t have played – that is short-changing the fans.

    Frankly, I find it baffling that he can lose form so quickly – in the absence of an injury – only a month after his compelling victories in London (and Basle and Paris before that.) Equally, it is strange that Djokovic can, in the same period, regain the kind of apparently invincible form he showed at the beginning of ‘011, when only a month earlier he complains of injuries and fatigue, and is there to be beaten by anybody. But if there is anything that is now obvious to me in professional sports it is how “cyclical” are the successes of the top competitors. A tennis commentator recently described (tongue in cheek) Nadal as suffering from “affective seasonal tennis disorder” because of his routine losses every year from the USO through to December. Of course a “shoulder injury” can always explain it (and a much fabled PRP injection cure it.)

    In the meantime, perhaps Roger should spend less time at the beach over the Christmas break.

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    Isk Youyousova Reply:

    We, fans and players should close the book on 2011. Djokovic gave a stunning performance in 2011. We should CHERISH it and move on. To try to compare every game played in 2011 to 2012 will simply be too stressful, lol and make 2012 game experience fatal. Djokovic was great, no doubt, but to carry it over to 2012 should not be an option. His record now is a new beginning, not an add on from last seasion.

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  2. I agree with you that Roger needs a few wins under his belt before the AO.Of course I´d love him to defend the title but that´s a long way ahead and I would rather he peaks for AO.
    Davydenko in first round is rough and sick and tired of Fed-Tsonga.
    New year, same draws.

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    Jiten Reply:

    Rather than facing a qualifier or a wild card, it may turn out to be an advantage for Fed as the tournament progresses if he faces a tough opponent like Koyla at the beginning itself. About the draw, we cannot help as Fed-Tsonga were the 2-3 seeds last year as well. As long as Fed keeps on defeating Tsonga, it’s not that bad. Only in AO we will be able to tell conclusively that the draw is completely rigged provided Nole and Fed are in the same half of the draw again. I am just curious to see how much more on Nadal’s injury drama unfolds at Doha.

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  3. I don’t think we have anything to worry about with Fed. As far as his form in the U.S. Open and the French Open, he played some great tennis. Federer will prevail this year and the less he expends his energy in the smaller events and the more he concentrates on the slams, the better his chances. Federer has what? around a thousand professional matches in his legs already and he is still a top five player. I got to hand to Federer for providing us all those high quality matches over the years and is still punching away. This is going to be an exciting year for Federer and a lot of people are still saying that the maestro will win at least one more slam. I

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  4. 2012 is an exciting year for Fedfans! He is not the hunted #1 anymore, who is expected to win every match. He is now the HUNTER, he is the guy who still hangs in there to SPOIL THE PARTY for the young wannabees! Djokovic has created huge expectations for 2012, like RF did in previous years. Djokovic is not the hunter anymore, he is now the hunted! He’s got to prove everything! Nadal was just denied to stay #1 when he finally overcame the GOAT in the ranking, and his party was completely spoiled by Djokovic last year. Nadal has to prove he can still come back again! Murray, well, the poor guy has still to prove that there is a champion in him after all. Everything to prove for him. And all these guys need to be aware that the GOAT is still out there, still enjoying himself, ready to punch if anyone is about to choke, if the bodies of the powerplayers go into strike, the artist might just show up in the form of JesusFed and give them the rest! RF is now beatable to any Top 10 player on any given day, and if the topguns are hot and firing, RF will need his very best to win, and if he does, it’s an upset, not to be expected! But hey, I enjoy this part of his career, the once unbeatable monster is still out there, taking his chances, ready to surprise and deny some joy to wannabes. It’s now time for the MEAN Rourager, the one who already broke the heart of Roddick denying him a well deserved Wimbledon title! He’s there, he must be expected to lose and go away, but you never really know. He might just start bring up his magic at any moment again. He is out there to be beaten, but be careful, and be afraid! He is a Tennis God, and he might get mean anytime! I love it. Let’s enjoy Djokovic, Nadal and eventually Murray trying to become like him, and lets see how far he’ll allow them into Tennis heaven! Happy 2012!

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  5. good post Ruan.
    so what should we expect from fed in 2012?
    i dont expect fed to win every match, dont expect him to go back to no 1 in the world.
    i DO expect:
    1. 4-5 titles
    2. among those titles – at least one slam (based on feds performence in this years RG and USO), and olympic singles gold medal (coz this is his last chance to get it).
    3. challange nole and rafa in big matches and no roll over.

    i think those expectations are reasonable and i think fed is expecting no less from himself. as long as fed doesnt lower his expectations from himself i dont think we sould either.

    [Reply]

    Ru-an Reply:

    Well of course Roger has high expectations for himself but he had those last year as well and if it wasn’t for the indoor season he would have ended up with 1 ATP 250 title. I have just seen my own reaction and the reaction of others when he doesn’t satisfy our expectations and it’s not pretty. Maybe it’s not the same for others, but I get very disappointed and it makes me negative. So personally I am lowering my expectations somewhat. I obviously can’t tell people what to do. Everyone has to decide for themselves what kind of fan they wana be. I just don’t like seeing people getting so wound up when Roger disappoints them.

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  6. Hey all soderling has mono, same as roger did in 2008, and has withdrawn from the Australian open. This just makes the way roger dealt with mono even more spectacular as he could still take part in tournaments and win matches! Soderling is no weakling I think and for him to withdraw from a grand slam just shows us how devastating the effect of mono has. But roger still managed to deal with it and even cling onto the no. 1 ranking for half a year :D nth but respect for the GOAT man.

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  7. I think Fed still holds high expectations for himself. At this stage in his career however, he just loves playing the game and that is his biggest drive. He has won everything, so winning even more is just a bonus. This year, I hope Fed wins one Slam, one Masters, and an Olympic Gold, and perhaps at the end of the year a 7th Masters Cup. This is all I want for Roger and I’m sure it’s around what his goals are too. Realistically he knows he won’t be winning everything but he just wants to keep his form steady and peak at the Slams, like he has done his entire career post-2003. What was said also about RF being the hunter and ND being the hunted is also VERY true. Last year, Djokovic was largely the hunter, but now everybody knows that he is the man to beat. Will he be able to handle the pressure of being #1 and having so many points to defend? We will see, but something tells me Roger will play much looser this year than last and will be more aggressive.

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    Ru-an Reply:

    Right Kyle. It’s all about the love for playing now, or else he way have quit by now. So why should we be any different? If he plays firstly for enjoyment and not for winning then we should do the same. We should enjoy watching him play and if he happens to win something big then it is a bonus. It’s pretty simple logic. What if he wins no slams this year, and loses before quarters in slams? What if he has a worse year than in 2011, and wins only one or two small titles titles? Are the people with the high expectations gonna abandon him then?

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    FeddyBear Reply:

    still my question remains – what do you consider a reasonable expectation form fed this year?

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    Ru-an Reply:

    I can only speak for myself. Personally I don’t expect anything. So whatever he achieves will be a nice bonus for me.

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    booya719 Reply:

    I think lowering your expectations to nothing is really not the best way to approach the end of Federer’s career. Whether a player loves the game or not, the object of the game is to win championships. Out of respect for the game it’s important to want to win. That’s what these players are on the court for trying to do – win the match. Gamesmanship as Nadal does is taking it too far, but Federer’s desire to win is the proper one. I see it as Nadal craves victory by any means, where as Federer strives for honest victory.

    Nadal likes to win for the sake of winning and has far less love for the game. They both want to win and they are champions for different reasons, but you should not separate winning from Federer’s love for the game. Different paths, different motives, but same goal: win. It’s because of Federer’s love of the game that he wants to win and has already won so much.

    The moment Federer decides to play tennis to just play it and stops caring about winning is the moment he needs to retire. Federer is a champion and champions play to win.

    [Reply]

    Ru-an Reply:

    You misunderstood. For Roger his love for the game always came first, while for Nadal it came second. That is why Roger is able to still have so much motivation. Of course winning is important, but if it is more important than your love for the game then we have another Nadal on our hands. Surely you don’t want that?

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    neil Reply:

    I agree with “Booya”. If Roger isn’t playing to win then as a professional he shouldn’t be still out there. But then we are only making assumptions if we think Roger isn’t trying to win or give of his best. Even at his peak his form would fluctuate. But now his troughs result in worse losses.

    What I don’t like to read are comments that suggest we should be satisfied with crumbs off the champions table. He is still better than that. If everything is now a “bonus” then that suggests he is already playing in his retirement; that he is doing little more than putting on occasional displays with the hope of getting lucky and winning something that matters. I doubt that he thinks that way, but still sees himself as very much in contention for the big titles. We are not watching James Blake limp towards imminent retirement here but Roger Federer, the current world no.3 and the winner of most slams in history. If he plays badly, as we have seen in the last week, then it should be recognised as such and no excuses made – he doesn’t make them, and neither should we. It definitely sounds like excuses to say that because exhos don’t count towards the rankings he wasn’t giving of his best efforts. His opponents certainly were – and so they should, or the fans deserve their money back.

    Roger undoubtedly plays for the love of the game. But that has always included winning. He doesn’t lose more often now because he has lost the edge of his desire to win; he is simply an older player whose form is harder and harder to sustain.

    For an admirer of his game, his losses can be hard to watch. I will always respect what he has achieved and given the sport. But when he plays like a shadow of his former self that has to be admitted, and regrettably it happens more often these days. When Roger is no longer a winner – and I am certainly hoping we are not nearing that point yet – then he should leave the pro’s locker room and entertain us with real exhos against Agassi, Sampras, Borg and Nastase. They are the guys who now play for fun.

    [Reply]

    Ru-an Reply:

    Who said he isn’t playing to win? Who said you should be satisfied with crumbs from the table? You are now putting words in my mouth. You are welcome to put your expectations as high as you like. You can expect him to win the calender golden slam for all I care. But don’t come cry to me if he doesn’t win a single slam or an Olympic gold.

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    Chris Reply:

    Funny discussion going on here ;-)
    I wrote in one of my previous comments that I don’t expect Federer to win anything in 2012. I do hope and greatly desire of course that he will win, the more the better, because that brings me immense joy as a fan. If he wins, then I’ll celebrate, if he loses, then I won’t be disappointed, because the fact that he still tries to win and tries to satisfy my hopes as a fan is already great for me. I’d miss him if he left the tour and I would be much less interested in the tennis circuit without him. So it is all just about me finding a way to stay positive and enjoy my time as a RF fan until the end of his career. But of course RF is playing to win! Of course I expect him to do everything he can and even reinvent himself if necessary to win. But this is not an expectation which puts me in the way of disappointment, because I never ever doubted that RF has the attitude of a champion trying and wanting to win. But I have learnt during the past years that RF is not just a brilliant player, but also a brilliant planner, he knows how to schedule, how to peak at the right moment, how to prepare for the really important moments. So, once again, sorry, but I can’t be bothered by him not giving his everything to win against the #1 or #2 in an exhibition match! Just because he is a smart guy, and he won’t risk an injury in an exhibition which might put in danger his smartly planned schedule. Doha is ahead, I expect RF to give it his best shot, and let’s see if he can get himself a good start into the season. Here is his point of view: (http://uk.eurosport.yahoo.com/03012012/58/federer-worries-ageing-body.html):
    “I hope I can really find a groove to give a good direction for later in the season when things are going to really pick up especially with the French Open, Wimbledon, the Olympics and the U.S. Open,” said the 16-times grand slam champion.
    “That is going to be a key sort of swing.”
    Federer believes world number one Novak Djokovic will again be the player to beat in 2012.
    “Djokovic was definitely the most consistent player last year and it looks like he’s in good shape again,” said the Swiss who meets 2010 Qatar champion Nikolay Davydenko of Russia in the first round on Tuesday.
    “It’s obviously Djokovic who is going to be followed very closely not just by the media but also by the players. It’s going to be interesting to see who’s going to have the best start to the season,” added the world number three.
    “You’ve got to play your best tennis against the best players in the big matches but one good match is not going to necessarily guarantee you an improvement in the rankings.
    “World rankings are based on play over 365 days of the year … so you need consistency,” added Federer.

    [Reply]

    neil Reply:

    Ruan, I certainly don’t have any expectations of Roger winning a golden slam or an Olympic gold medal, as you suggest. But after his form at the end of last year I expect him to do better than the straight-sets thrashing he took at hands of both Djokovic and Nadal in Abu Dhabi, who only a month ago were fatigued and in significantly less than stellar form themselves. For me the more interesting question is how Djokovic has (once again)transformed his game in only a month, while Roger’s game is apparently nothing like it before the Christmas break, and Nadal meanwhile complains (as usual)of injury but continues to play through it without apparent impediment, while indicating that he will take a break after the AO but will nevertheless play the slam (and, presumably, to win.) Frankly, if he can play it is not an injury – it is an excuse. Or worse – a subterfuge. I place more stock in the credibility of WWE than professional tennis these days.

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  8. When Roger plays awful like he did in Abu Dhabi there’s nothing wrong with being concerned. We are not jumping ship or changing emotions blindly. We are simply stating the reality of the matter. Yeah, it’s only an exhibition but playing horrible tennis is playing horrible tennis. “It’s just an exhibition” is beside the point because tennis is tennis and Roger was awful regardless of the importance of the event. It’s perfectly normal for the whole world to analyze it and have their say. Federer’s level in Abu Dhabi will not be enough to win against Davydenko so he needs to come up with a much better effort on the spot from round 1.

    Losing is one thing but not trying and not putting any effort into a performance is another matter. I’m satisfied with mostly all of Roger’s performances as long as he put his best effort into them win or lose. I think the majority are merely disappointed that there was no effort in Federer’s Abu Dhabi performance. That for me is definite cause for concern. Last year in Abu Dhabi he was good and was playing to win against Nadal. The effort was there last year. This year…not so much. A week before the event Federer said himself he wanted to win Abu Dhabi and that he was looking to start off the year with a win there. His performance was a bit contrary to that. We all know Roger is less effective outdoors in slower conditions but it doesn’t matter what the surface or conditions are if he doesn’t put forth the effort needed to win.

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    Ru-an Reply:

    The difference between me and you is that I don’t panic. At this point I see no reason why he should lose to Davydenko and to be concerned. Only if he does, then I will be concerned. But I’m certainly not gonna let my expectations be influenced by a meaningless exho.

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  9. I view this stage as Federer’s second career. After winning RG and his 15th major in 2009 he completed his first career: establishing himself as the greatest Grand Slam champion to play the game. Until then, he was competing against history and the great champions of the past.

    In this second phase of his career, he’s competing against himself. It’s about proving something to himself, not satisfying some external criterion. His goal is to surpass his own limitations and raise the standard he himself set, which extremely few individuals in any field are capable of doing.

    To compensate for the aging process and the increased physical prowess of his rivals, he’s been forced to make a few adjustments to his game and make use of skills he didn’t have to use when he was younger.

    So he’s starting with a clean slate, returning to an experimental phase of his game, with no guarantee of success. It’s akin to a rebirth.

    So we get to root for this brilliant young journeyman (30+ years young) to make it all over again, but without all the stress and worry that came with wondering whether he would ever complete the Career Slam or surpass Sampras’ Grand Slam record.

    There are new questions, new challenges for Federer to face. Will Roger Federer ever be #1? Will he ever break through in the Grand Slam arena? Can he hold off the challenges of younger, stronger hotshots? Just how much more can he win, and how much longer can he keep pushing the envelope?

    What are some further goals that could motivate the man who has everything?

    –winning RG by defeating Nadal in the final. Defending an RG title would also be nice.
    *
    –The Calendar Slam.
    *
    –Breaking the record for time spent at the #1 ranking.
    *
    –Being the first man to regain the year-end #1 ranking twice.
    *
    –Olympic gold medal in singles.
    *
    –Breaking the Open Era records for titles won at a particular Grand Slam. He already co-holds the records at AO and USO with Agassi and Sampras/Connors respectively. He could conceivably break those records and/or break Sampras’ record at Wimbledon.
    *
    –More YEC titles. He already holds that record, but he might be able to win a couple more.

    Only a very special player like Roger Federer could have not one, but two careers, though Agassi did something similar when he won RG in 1999 and returned to the top. And it’s a privilege, and a lot of fun, to watch him in his second career as he seeks to outdo himself.

    [Reply]

    Wilfried Reply:

    I agree to a large extent with your view, Steve. Roger is in his second career and aims other goals than in his first. A fifth AO- title would be a nice accomplishment but can’t have the same value for Roger as the goals you mention in your post.
    What are my expectations for Roger in 2012 ? In general I hope that Roger can take a lot of pleasure and delight in his daily family life and seeing his adorable twins growing up healthy and happy.
    In terms of performance on the tennis courts, I hope it will offer him the basement to extend at least his streak of quarter finals in the slams. Furthermore I’d like him, if slightly possible, to pick up another slam title, preferably the Roland Garros title in Paris. However for this to work, it is necessary that ‘el toreador’ and ‘el toro’ (referring to Djokovic and Nadal) will keep wearing each other out and smooth the way for Roger. I want them therefore to go deep in the AO and afterwards hurt each other enough in the build-up to the second slam of the year, so that Roger can step in the arena and could possibly make the royal bull finally bent and kneel down for him, as I don’t see any other serious contenders at this moment to prevent Roger from picking up a second RG-title.
    John Newcombe recently preferred to use the metaphor of a heavyweight boxer being knocked down to describe the ongoing fight between Djokovic and Nadal, suggesting that both will perform at a less elevated level in 2012. My belief is that this fight between Djokovic and Nadal is not over yet, and that the royal bull may indeed be bleading but not yet bowing. I believe and hope therefore that the number one’s and two will keep pressing each other to the limits, as it is essentially there way of playing tennis.
    Besides the top three, there are probably some other armed horsemen to play a part in the spectacle who could put a spoke in the weels: my “dark horsemen” for 2012 are Juan Martin Del Potro, Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, Andy Murray, Bernard Tomic and Grigor Dimitrov

    [Reply]

    neil Reply:

    “Until then, he was competing against history and the great champions of the past.In this second phase of his career, he’s competing against himself”

    What an extraordinary claim. It suggests that from the beginning of his career, in 1998, Roger was competing against the achievements of past champions, and not simply trying to beat his opponent across the net in front of him. The hubris in that attitude would be off the meter – if it were not patently wrong to the point of absurdity. Like any tennis pro, Roger has known it has always been one match at a time. When did he start “competing against history”? After his first slam? His second? Third? When exactly?

    And now he is “competing against himself”. That at least might explain why he is losing more often to his opponent at the other end of the court. Perhaps that is who he should be trying to beat.

    So when did Roger decide his first career was over, and his second begins? Has he ever said anything to indicate that? Or are these simply the projections of fans struggling to accept that he is no longer the best player in the game?

    Wher is the evidence that Roger’s game has changed dramatically in this “rebirth’? He played more quick-point tennis in his early career, using far more serve-volley and net attack than he has in his later career. I see essentially the same serve, forehand, backhand and volleys – all superb but also quite often errant these days – and the same basic attitude of going for the winner before his opponent does.

    Agassi won most of his slams in the later part of his career – after he had almost slipped out of the top hundred and then worked his way back. Roger’s career shows no such comparison or dramatic fluctuation. His relative decline has been more gradual, but a decline it is – Djokovic and Nadal have seen to that – and he hasn’t won a slam in 2 years. Is that the period when he is “competing against himself”? (I would prefer to see him beat the other guy.)

    His problem is that the game has moved on, with more power hitters and tireless retrievers of the ball, while Roger has gotten older. There’s no easy answer in that for Roger. We might hope that the Ides may come together for him at least once more in a major tournament – it is still possible – but such a victory, as sweet as it would be, would still only delay the inevitable; the last Act and denouement at the close of a brilliant career. But an entirely new play, with himself as the author? I don’t think so. As the bard put it, “that is the stuff dreams are made on.”

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    Wilfried Reply:

    Is Roger fantasizing and fooling himself when he was saying – not that long ago- that “it is only logical to improve as a player”? Was he in complete, tragic denial of his declining results ? I believe and hope not so, Niel. As Roger is a player whose game is built more around precision and technique than it is around speed and power, I believe that Roger certainly has fine tuned and improved parts of his game. To give you an example his backhand is more versatile as well as he is hitting the ball earlier than he used to (and shanking the shot when his timing is late or imperfect), to contend to moon-balls that Nadal effectively designed and executed against him. You can’t call those changes revolutionary of course, but they are improvements in his game. His opponents are improving too of course, probably at a higher pace, but to me it is clear that if any of his rivals go backwards or even stand still this year then Roger is perfectly poised to take advantage of it.

    [Reply]

  10. Ruan, you make some great points about not getting our hopes up. As you wrote, it’s been tough being a Roger fan the past couple of years. At the beginning of 2011, I really believed Roger was going to win in Australia. His form at the YEC was JesusFed and then he won Doha. But I was bitterly disappointed when Djoker took him out in Australia.

    So this year I’m trying very hard to keep things in perspective and not get too excited. I still feel Nole is the player to beat at the AO. One thing you haven’t discussed but which I am moderately optimistic about is that in 2012, I think Roger can improve on his H2H against Rafa. If he beats him at Doha, it will stand at 10-17. I really want Roger to narrow the gap in their H2H for his legacy. Rafa looks burned out to me and mentally fried. Roger looks fresh!

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    Ru-an Reply:

    Thanks Candace, you and me seems to be on a similar wavelength. I’m not too concerned about the h2h. I think Roger made a big statement when he destroyed Nadal at the WTF. It’s mostly about surfaces in this h2h.

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