Djokovic Routines Nadal 6-3, 6-4 on Very Slow Indoor Court

NOW I’m satisfied. Roger did his part but I wasn’t gonna rest until Nadal gets denied yet another Masters Cup title. It is clear that Nadal is a terrible indoor player for someone who people claim are in the GOAT debate. How can you be in the GOAT debate if you haven’t even won one Masters Cup? On Roger’s worst surface he has made 5 slam finals and won 1 slam. Behind Nadal he was by far the second best clay courter of his generation. Nadal made a mere two Masters Cup finals and got soundly beaten in both. He definitely isn’t the second best indoor player of his generation. Not even close. How can this guy possibly be in the GOAT debate with Federer? Not to mention Federer has won the same event a record 6 times. Nadal fans have this idea that the same can be said for Roger because he doesn’t have Olympic gold in singles.

Personally I never rated the Olympic gold as an important achievement in tennis, but even if it was then lets look at who has won it and who has won the Masters Cup. The Olympic singles gold was won by Massu and Rosset. If you look at past Masters Cup champions it has almost always been all time greats. The worst players to have won it has probably been Corretja, Nalbandian, and Davydenko. These were great players in their own right. Certainly much more accomplished than Massu and Rosset. Also the Olympics come around only every 4 years. I just don’t rate it and to me it doesn’t matter in the least that Roger didn’t win it. Same for Davis Cup. Those are more like nice extras to have but in the bigger picture they are irrelevant. Anyway enough of the whole GOAT debate thing. I’m sure Nadal will catch up with Roger’s slam count, but there is clearly still a hole in his resume if he can’t win at least one Masters Cup.

As far as the #1 ranking goes Nadal secured it when he beat Wawrinka in his second group match and gets his third year end #1. Pretty good effort but it’s ironic that right at the moment he took the #1 ranking from Djokovic, he not only defeated him easily in Beijing but he dominated the tour since then like a true #1 should. He won Beijing, Shanghai, Paris, and London and is now on a 22-match winning streak. That’s damn impressive. Nadal on the other hand hasn’t added a title post US Open. Since the US Open he has been routined twice by Djokovic, once by Del Potro, and once by Ferrer even. Even though he is #1 he certainly isn’t having the results of a #1, and he only just secured the year end #1. With all the points he has to defend post Australian Open next year you’d expect Djokovic to pass him again somewhere in the clay season.

As far as the final goes my stream was shaky again but Djokovic got the early break, took a 3-0 lead, and then almost broke again. Nadal did his usual thing where he comes back from the brink as he held serve and then broke Djokovic to square things up again.It’s around this time that my stream broke up but when I looked again I was pleased to see that Djokovic broke again and took the 1st set 6-3. Afterwards I saw the point with which Djokovic broke a second time and what a point it was. The beauty of it was that Djokovic made an unbelievable defensive lob, the kind Nadal usually makes. It’s just gorgeous when Nadal is given his own medicine so that he knows what it feels like when someone pushes the best you throw at them back relentlessly. Nadal must have thought he had the point won with the volley, but the ball came back over his head and he ended up losing the point.

That is the kind of play he uses against other players like Roger to destroy them mentally. So it’s satisfying to see it being done to him. In the 2nd set Djokovic continued his dominance. Despite even indoor courts having been slowed down to the point that you can’t call what they played in the final indoor tennis, Nadal was still dominated by the more aggressive player. The brand of tennis he plays indoors is laughable. Go watch the 1996 Masters Cup final between Sampras and Becker and you will see what indoor tennis is, or maybe I will post it below. Nadal doesn’t deserve to win the Masters Cup the way he plays. It’s just too much pushing, defending, and moonballing. He has no plan B either. If moonballing to the opponent’s backhand doesn’t work he runs out of ideas. Djokovic’s backhand is one of the best ever which immediately makes things hard for Nadal.

Of course Djokovic also has one of the best returns of serve which means Nadal can’t take as much advantage of the fact that he has the left-handed serve. Just like Nadal is the anti-Federer Djokovic is the anti-Nadal. It’s a shame he lost that French Open semi because he was in control and it probably cost him the US Open too. But at least he has now routined Nadal in their last two matches which I think is very important for the rivalry. Nadal was threatening to start dominating the rivalry again and the indoor season couldn’t have come at a better time. Now the Australian Open becomes very interesting indeed. Nadal seems to have figured out how to beat Djokovic on outdoor hard courts but of course the Australian Open is Djokovic’s best slam. Nadal already came very close to beating Djokovic there in 2012.

And after beating Djokovic at the French and US Open he is definitely in with a shot of beating Djokovic in Melbourne. That we don’t want. That would put Nadal equal with Sampras on 14 slams and another hard court slam in the bag. So I think what transpired in the Djokodal rivalry since the US Open has been kinda crucial. Nadal got the important wins in the rivalry this year but Djokovic has utterly dominated the indoor season and got that two convincing wins over Nadal. If it wasn’t for that I would have made Nadal the favorite to win in Melbourne, but now things are more like 50/50 again. I’m not sure Nadal will win the Australian Open next year. He will also slump again at some point if the past is anything to go by, while Roger will rise. This looks like it has already started happening in the indoor season.

I think Roger will continue to rise in 2014 while Nadal may continue to fall, since his form in the indoor season was already less impressive than in the rest of 2013. The Australian Open does suit Nadal’s game pretty well though, while it doesn’t suit Roger’s game so well these days. So maybe Nadal can still start the year off well in Australia, but I can definitely see him slump again at some point. Maybe another injury and break from the game after a tough loss. As for Roger I’m not gonna put any pressure on him to do really well in Melbourne. Last year it was his best slam but this time he won’t have a top 4 ranking and he is not in that kind of form anymore. Not yet anyway. You never know, but I’m not gonna set my expectations high. If he can make quarters I’d be satisfied. That would be a good result. Anything more would be a bonus.

I’m just being realistic. The courts are damn slow there these days and just doesn’t give Roger much assistance. One thing I would like to see is that he works his ass off in the off season as far as fitness goes. He is not playing any exhos this time(thank God) and in Australia fitness is huge. It’s hot and the slow courts make for grueling base line rallies. I don’t want to see him come through a tough 5-setter again and have nothing left for his next match. I really think fitness is gonna be key if he is going to continue playing at a high level and maybe win another slam. That is something he can control and which is especially important now that he is older. I’m not talking about working hard. I’m talking about working unbelievably hard. More than anything his fitness will determine how the rest of his career goes.

Well I think that’s about enough for now. I was satisfied when Roger made the semis, but now that Nadal has lost as well I am happy. It may sound cruel but consider how all the courts have been slowed down these days, even indoors. Personally I can’t stand the conspiracy theorists, but things have gone so far that even I have started to believe that something weird is going on. It’s like they honestly want Nadal to win everything and become the next GOAT. I guess they feel like that would cause the most interest in tennis and make them the most money. So they adjust all the courts and conditions in a way that suits him. First he gets a cakewalk draw in London and they have made the courts in London even slower and higher bouncing. It just happens so many times that you feel it can’t be just a coincidence anymore.

And of course all of this make it that much harder for Roger. It seems unfair to such a great servant of the game that they are making conditions in a way that is suiting him less and less when he already has age counting against him. There is no doubt that if they sped things up again it would add several years to Roger’s career at the top of the game. But the way it is going they will probably play the Masters Cup on indoor clay next year. Just to make sure Nadal gets his title and can be declared GOAT. At least there is Djokovic who can still act as the protector of Roger’s legacy as he builds his own legacy. Roger’s attitude towards Nadal and Djokovic has always struck me as strange. I think he should reverse that and be friends with Djokovic for protecting his legacy and disrespect Nadal to kick his ass in the future.

Why does he respect Nadal so much? Didn’t Nadal take a bathroom break when he was about to serve for the match in Indian Wells? Isn’t Nadal the one who uses gamesmanship all the time while Djokovic is just being his cocky self? Yes Djokovic can be very annoying but at least he is just being himself. He is not false like Nadal who acts humble but in the mean time every word and action betrays that act. As if the ATP hasn’t conformed to his every need he had the nerve to say that it’s unfair that the Masters Cup is played on hard court. We have heard several similar statements from the so-called humble Spaniard over the years. It is just baffling how self-centered and full of himself this guy is. And if there is one thing I can’t stand in this world it is being false. I despise nothing more. These attitudes of Roger towards Nadal and Djokovic is something I will never understand.

Highlights:

The point that destroyed Nadal: 

Real indoor tennis(don’t miss match point):

Posted in Uncategorized.

123 Comments

  1. We think along the same lines. Denied another Masters’ Cup. Now when will ATP bring back faster courts? About time to change the boredom of the baseline exchanges. We watched Aussie 2011 Live and it was 5 plus hours of boredom.

    [Reply]

  2. I think that Roger is starting to appreciate and respect Novak more than before. And by the way, I remember vivdly when Nadal went for a bathroom break on match point. What a cheap ass!

    Can’t you hold your “shit” together man! ;-) Seriously!

    That’s why Roger is loved by everyone and Nadal is hated by everyone! It’s simple! Novak has earned my respect, however!

    When Roger and Novak play, I feel like they are both fighting to the end, but they both play this attacking tennis. That’s why when Novak wins, it’s ok! With Nadal it’s the opposite. That’s why I loved how Djokovic did the sane to Nadal – cut him down with these unbelievable sliding gets. Demoralizing stuff. I loved it! ;-)

    [Reply]

    Alex Reply:

    No Vily, the problem is that most people like nadal.

    [Reply]

    V Reply:

    Its a bit of both.I think Nadal started to get a lot of fans because people were literally in awe of this person who came out wearing army trousers and sleeveless shirts taking it to the best player on the planet-Roger Federer and doing something which was a very first-dominating Federer.
    That is the reason I believe for him to have such a fan base that people have started to become completely ignorant and I think they are also naive to see through his fake humility and ridiculously obvious gamesmanship tactics

    [Reply]

    Katyani Reply:

    “I remember vivdly when Nadal went for a bathroom break on match point”.
    And how did our Goat repay him when he came back from his bathroom break??? With an ace on matchpoint !!! Trust me, Roger was preparing that ace all that time. He does know how Rafa works you know !!!

    By the way, to be honest, I use to like Novak, even when he acts like a “gorilla”. I liked him a lot. But when his dad spoke bad about Roger (and Rafa) and Novak distanced himself from what his dad said, I lost some respect for him (which is not back by the way). I thought that was extremely cowardly. Yes, it was his dad’s words, but he made it for Novak, so Novak should have said: “look I am sorry my dad said those things. He should not have. They are not mine words, but I am responsible for what he says and I am sorry”. If Novak would have done that, even if he did not know his dad would say that, I would respect him SO much more !!! Whether you like it or not (goes also for Roger and the rest) you are responsible for what your team says on behalf of you…

    [Reply]

    Jian Reply:

    I don`t think it is Novak`s fault. His dad just doesn’t seem like the kind of person who listens. We don’t know what goes on in their family. Maybe his dad is the one controlling him? It is quite awkward for these players with their outspoken parents and I don’t think they should receive further blame for the embarrassment that they have suffered.

    [Reply]

    Katyani Reply:

    Hey Jian, I agree on with you on one point. It was not Novak’s fault. I don’t think I have said it was. He could not do anything about it. BUT to be honest, I did not like the fact that Novak distanced himself from the things his dad said. That is nog good. Novak is a tennisplayer and his dad said it on behalf of his son who is a tennisplayer. So whether Novak likes it or not he is responsible.
    And I mean what I said. If Roger’s dad had said this about another player, I would say that Roger is responsible and that he himself should apologise. It is not only because it was Novak. No it goes for every player. Sorry, they are not the parents or teachers of their team, but they are responsible for them….
    Ps: Why hasn’t Novak’s dad apologised himself???

    [Reply]

    Ru-an Reply:

    I don’t agree. Novak is not responsible for his dad. He is his own person. You can’t take responsibility for your parents. It is rather the other way around. They have to take responsibility for you.

    [Reply]

    Katyani Reply:

    Sorry, I disagree with you both, but lets just leave it at that. If his dad said something about Roger and Rafa then it would be all on him. But Novak’s dad said something about Roger and Rafa the tennisplayers in regard to his son the tennisplayer. That is Novak’s responsibility. Just like the prime minister is responsible if someone from his party makes a wrong comment (atleast that is the case in Holland). But like I said, lets agree to disagree……

    [Reply]

    Ru-an Reply:

    You may have a point. He could apologize but he has a pretty big ego. He probably feels it would make him look weak if he apologizes. Especially to Fed who disrespects him already. He should apologize to Fed and show him he is the bigger man.

    [Reply]

    Jian Reply:

    Why do you say Fed disrespects him? Have you seen this? http://www.indianexpress.com/news/wimbledon-ive-buried-hatchet-with-djokovic-says-roger-federer/970660/1
    I know it was over a year ago but has it changed much? They may not agree on certain things but I think disrespect is too strong a word.

    [Reply]

    Ru-an Reply:

    Where were you during the handshakes of their matches in Paris and London? I don’t believe for a second he has ‘buried the hatchet’ with Djokovic.

    [Reply]

    Jian Reply:

    I’ve seen the handshakes but I don`t see much wrong with them. They were not warm, but for all the time they spent on the court I just don`t think a single action is enough to suggest there is anything personal between them.

    [Reply]

    Katyani Reply:

    Hey Ru-an, this is why I like you a lot. You are honest. You say when I said something wrong and you also say when I have a point. I love that.
    By the way, I am happy. Berdych and Stepanek just won Davis Cup. Fully deserved. Atleast Berdych also has a “title” this year, not quite, but still….

    [Reply]

    Ru-an Reply:

    Thanks Katyani. I try to be realistic and fair.

    [Reply]

  3. Lets hope Roger has a good season in 2014. And the final between Sampras and Becker was a joy to watch.. True indoor tennis. Look how fast the ball travels. And now such winners are not at all possible. All thanks to the ATP’s selfish & money-minded motives

    [Reply]

  4. I agree with many of your points. Why are all the surfaces being slowed down? It’s obvious that it suits one player more than any other. Even so, it still doesn’t enable Nadal to win the most important title at the end of the season. Zero as against six titles – no comparison.

    I don’t mean to crow but I said a while back that I didn’t expect Nadal would win another title after the USO until well into next year (maybe Indian Wells or Miami – unless Djokovic stops him there, too, which is on the cards). It’s an unmistakeable cycle in his performance that happens every year. It’s not just the surface. The player who destroyed everyone in the first half of the year, and conceded only one set to Djkovic in the USO final, was surely capable of winning one of the later year masters (and remember, Beijing and Shanghai are actually outdoor tournaments.) It’s complete b/s. But you can bet he will be back to his top form in Australia – while still complaining about his knees.

    Djokovic is meanwhile teaching him again who is boss. I must say, given my views on the topic of doping in tennis, that I think Djokovic has doped since 2011 and that is how he has been able to match Nadal since in stamina and defense, something he was previously unable to do, but I prefer his game over the moonballer’s and he is more genuinely himself. As I read from a commenter on another website, Nadal’s influence on the game “is nothing short of toxic”. Djokovic on the other hand can be a funny guy, who shows who he really is out there, and has a much better and more varied game than the Spaniard. But of course, he also shows, to me, that to beat the Spaniard at his own game you probably have to cross over to the dark side.

    As you say, it is quite puzzling why Fed seems to like Nadal but not Djokovic. I think it may be that he feels he gets less respect from Djokovic, who is a pretty cocky character, but with Djokovic there is no humble shtick, and if anybody is more responsible for doing a Lance Armstrong to tennis it’s gotta be the Spaniard.

    Also, like you, I am hoping an injury-free Fed can find better form next year. He’s got to become a fitter player, as you argue, but there are also weaknesses in his game that he has got to work on – chiefly the backhand, and the errors. Maybe that’s part of the mental equipment, too.

    [Reply]

    Ru-an Reply:

    Have you seen this Rich? This pretty much explains what is going on with Nadal. It looks like he is legally doping. IF this is the case he is not doing anything illegal. He is just taking advantage of a pathetic doping control system, which is something Djokovic has criticized heavily himself. To me this explains a lot, and I don’t think Nadal is necessarily doping illegally anymore, because it seems that this stuff contains enough dope already… http://ajs.sagepub.com/content/41/1/186

    [Reply]

    rich Reply:

    Ruan, the article effectively argues that PRP has a boosting effect, against the previous determinations of WADA. If that is correct, I would think WADA would be likely to review its position on PRP. However, there is medical research that also suggests that in terms of treating actual injury PRP has little more than a placebo effect. In that case an athlete may not be using it to treat real injury but to boost performance (if it does that.) There is another factor in this. A tennis player choosing to use it as treatment could claim a Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE) for an otherwise banned substance, like human growth hormone, which can be associated with treatment of injury – as well as its use as a performance enhancement drug. Obviously the effects – the “treatment” are highly advantageous to the athlete – and within the rules. The “injuries” are of course bogus (“knees”, anyone?), it’s cheating, but it’s legal.

    These are all possibilities. The point is, if an athlete is gaining advantage this way they are becoming a better athlete than before treatment, and would have otherwise committed a doping violation.

    Of course there are many other ways of taking performance enhancing drugs, and doping to boost stamina such as through the use of EPO’s, or blood doping, would be one of them – although not part of PRP treatment as far as I know. It’s a complex equation. Sophisticated dopers don’t do this stuff on their own at the back of the gym. They have teams and – so they don’t damage their health – doctors to help them – like Dr Del Moral, from Spain (currently undergoing a ban.) In Nadal’s case I wouldn’t be surprised if he is on the full pharmacy, so to speak. PRP is unlikely to be the extent of it. He may have access to legal loopholes for some of what he does – but it’s still doping.

    [Reply]

    Ru-an Reply:

    I think there is a certain group of people who wants Nadal to be doping illegally so that they can say they were right all along or that what he achieved becomes not legit. I think PRP could possibly explain his physical performance, because if you read that article there is proof that substances WADA is monitoring is heightened in individuals who does PRP. Those substances are in other words performance enhancing. And of course Nadal doesn’t actually have to be injured to use it. He can fake injury to gain the advantages of it. In this way he would be doing something completely legal. I’m not saying it’s acceptable, because he still gains an unfair advantage over players who don’t use it. But if it’s legal then other players can use it too. The difference is that other players may have a moral conscience, while Nadal will do anything within the rules to win, like we have seen countless times with his gamesmanship. It is not against the rules but it is not moral. And it should be clear by now that Nadal is not a moral man. For him one thing counts and one thing alone – winning. Morality can go to hell. This is his mindset. But it doesn’t necessarily means he is a cheat. If there are loopholes that allows players to dope legally, why risk getting caught?

    [Reply]

    rich Reply:

    I don’t think PRP would be enough by itself. Or we would all be doing it!

    [Reply]

    Ru-an Reply:

    Why would we all be doing it? It’s expensive, you have to have a doctor to make sure it doesn’t damage your health, and we are not even professional athletes!

    [Reply]

    rich Reply:

    Ruan, I have friends who have used PRP for injury treatment. It was no big deal. Nor was it expensive. It can be administered by any sports doctor. It hasn’t been outstandingly successful in curing my friends’ injuries, and it certainly hasn’t turned them into supermen! James Blake had PRP for knee tendonitis, with very limited success. It added nothing to his athleticism. PRP is a pretty routine but somewhat over-rated injury treatment, that basically tries to increase blood-flow to the injured part of the body to aid healing. Sometimes it works. Sometimes it doesn’t. What it doesn’t do is turn you into Nadal, whatever the media claim. That’s a fairly transparent attempt to find a legit rationale for what can only otherwise be explained by doping. And doping is absolutely not legit.

    [Reply]

    Ru-an Reply:

    I heard it works wonders for some and hardly at all for others. Maybe he is one of them it works wonders for.

    [Reply]

    rich Reply:

    Then why has he always got bad knees?

    [Reply]

    Ru-an Reply:

    You believe that? I’m not so sure he has knee problems. It may just be a way to justify the PRP use, or an excuse for when he loses.

    [Reply]

    rich Reply:

    That’s exactly my point. PRP certainly isn’t doing a very good job for his knees. If they are really injured. So, his injuries – and PRP – are a likely front for something else.

    [Reply]

    Gaurav Sood Reply:

    I completely agree.

    As for the remarkable comeback that people seem to be going gaga about- I don’t think anything that serious was wrong in the first place. He was bleeding matches and what better way to stop the rot than to resort to his standard fall back excuse- his knees. I can’t fathom how his knees can be perfect one tournament (French 2012) only to be the cause for a seven month lay off two weeks later (Wimbledon 2012). It makes no medical sense whatsoever. He’s made it a point to use his knees as an excuse any time he plays poorly or wants to hide from some situation he knows he can’t win- on or off the court. It’s scheme-y to say the least. That’s what I admire about Fed. He may not always give credit to his opponent when he loses, but he never makes a big show about injuries. There’s no drama. None.

    There’s nothing remarkable about Nadal’s comeback, simply because I don’t feel there was anything wrong to begin with. It was a win win for him. Stay- he would have continued getting hammered by Nole in the fall season (historically his weakest period) perhaps lost an odd match to Roger.

    This way he chose the part of the season he always struggles with to be ‘injured’, disappeared off the face of the earth, worked on his tactics, took some magic potions and voila, came back on the clay courts perfectly fine. Boy! What a comeback.

    [Reply]

    Ru-an Reply:

    Haha well said Gaurav.

    [Reply]

    Ute Reply:

    Hey Rich, completely agree with you. Especially about the toxic effect of Nadal. When Nadal first burst onto the stage, he set a new benchmark in terms of fitness and strength for a tennis player. Such a physical speciman had never before been seen on a tennis court and it seems, many people dig what they perceive as the triumph of hard work over pure talent.

    And Nadal was very welcome back then too, because many people were tired of the Federer domination during that time. When Nadal first reached the final in Wimbledon in 2006, people were actually cheering a lot more for him, less for Fed. He was the underdog.

    So what about his influence on other players? I believe that it is very difficult for them to emulate the Federer brand of play, aggressive shotmaking from all over the court. Else, why don’t we see more of that? Unfortunately I don’t see any young promising player at the moment with a comparative ability. (Please don’t say Dimitrov) But to ascend to Nadal levels of stamina and power? Djokovic somehow found a way to match that in 2011 and Nadal got the first bitter taste of his own medicine.

    He retreated and came back, better and stronger, I believe, he put on a higher gear, upped the ante and it’s possible that Djokovic will follow suit. Besides that Djokovic has the superior game when compared to Nadal. He won’t let Nadal take it all. And I believe, they will set a trend in the field, surely others also want to play with the big guns once in a while.

    Concerning Fed’s relationship to Nadal and Djokovic – I believe we don’t see the true feelings of any party involved. If he said anything bad about Nadal, criticizing his game/gamesmanship or anything like that, it would fall back on his feet anyway. There’s also the fact that they have the same sponsor. It seems there was some friction though between them in the ATP player council with the consequence of Nadal resigning as vice president. So I’m not at all convinced about the public image as “friends”. And it’s not really surprising when they don’t share a lot of opinions.

    Re PRP – Personally I don’t believe that’s all there is to Nadal’s preparation. :-(

    [Reply]

    Alex Reply:

    Hey Ruan I believe you posted a link to this article a while back. The answers are all there. Since PRP makes your bloodwork seem like you are doping then, the procedure can effectively be used to mask doping. So if you are caught doping you can claim that it’s the PRP which is legal. Have you forgotten about this article? http://tennishasasteroidproblem.blogspot.com/2011/02/curious-case-of-rafael-nadal.html

    [Reply]

    Ru-an Reply:

    Very interesting Alex. The case against Nadal seems to get stronger all the time. I have never trusted the guy.

    [Reply]

  5. “Nadal seems to have figured out how to beat Djokovic on outdoor hard courts but of course the Australian Open is Djokovic’s best slam”

    Agreed that Nadal definitely has a chance to beat djokovic in Australia however it all depends which djokovic turns up. The difference of the two players at the US open was that djokovic was making way too many unforced errors while nadal was on fire. also it seemed as if after the french open djokovic was dipping slowly but surely(maybe stopped using the egg chamber). But ever since he lost the no.1 ranking he has found new motivation. he is the sharper of the two players right now. If this djokovic turns up at the auzzie open then he has a great chance of winning. Also who knows, maybe australia will hold a few surprises for everyone !

    [Reply]

    Ru-an Reply:

    Well I think the USO loss had to do with the way he lost to Nadal at the FO. That was a very tough loss to digest. In fact I thought he may not recover the rivalry again. But fortunately he won these last two matches which surely did a lot towards believing in himself against Nadal again. He was really starting to lose it against Nadal. First the FO, then in Montreal, and then New York. He will have a great shot in Melbourne but so will Nadal, which is why I say it’s 50/50 if they face off. Really hard to pic a favorite.

    [Reply]

    Alex Reply:

    I have to say I agree fully with that

    [Reply]

  6. “I think he should reverse that and be friends with Djokovic for protecting his legacy and disrespect Nadal to kick his ass in the future.”

    I disagree Ru-an. I feel that being friends with someone just for pragmatic reasons is well,kind of fake. Roger is someone who has integrity so he wouldn’t do that. You regard someone as a friend because you like them on a personal level, not because you stand to gain something from it.

    [Reply]

    Ru-an Reply:

    You misunderstood me. I think Djokovic is a more likable guy and more deserving of respect than Nadal. Yes Djokovic can be cocky and annoying as hell but like I said at least he is just being himself. He is also a character, can be funny, and always shakes the opponents hand at the net the same, win or lose. He does not use gamesmanship like Nadal. He is not false. He is who he is in doesn’t apologize for it. It just so happens that he is also protecting Roger’s legacy, and if it wasn’t for him Nadal would have been on 16 slams and a Masters Cup title already, breathing heavily down the neck of Roger in the GOAT debate. I’m not saying Roger should like him, but for that at least he can be a little more respectful towards Djokovic. I also don’t understand all the respect for Nadal. It is one of the reasons Nadal keeps owning him in the h2h. He has way too much respect for Nadal on and off court. Nadal’s respect for Roger is not real. He praises him openly but secretly he wants to shatter his records. And like I said he uses gamesmanship against Roger too. On the court he sees Roger as just another opponent who stands in his way to glory and he wants to destroy him at all costs. It would help Roger if he can have a bit of the same attitude towards Nadal.

    [Reply]

    Jian Reply:

    Ok,I understand where you’re coming from although I don’t totally agree. I feel that his mutual respect for Nadal doesn’t really affect the way he competes against him.

    [Reply]

    Ru-an Reply:

    I think it does. If he treats Nadal with less respect Nadal would sense it on court and Roger would be less merciful to him when he has chances to put him away.

    [Reply]

    Jian Reply:

    Well respect for Nadal as a person and respect for his game are different things. If Roger has all along been ok with Nadal’s character, why should he start losing respect for him? But perhaps he does have some fear of Nadal’s game that he needs to get over with. Usually champion athletes are good at focusing on what needs to be done in the moment, but then again Roger has lost to Nadal so many times that you never know what is going on in his head.

    [Reply]

  7. I agree with everything said by now and can only add my opinion that Djokovic is not allowed to freely use his egg chamber ot whatever performace enhancing drugs he was on troughout the season of 2011. Weir as it seems after US Open he unexplcably lifted his level like it was the start of the new season…

    Ther`s no question that when both are on their best “juice” Djokovic is a clear favorite on any surface. Unfortunatelly after Australia Open 2012 Djoko is not on the same juice. Looking at his performances on this FO semi and US Open final …he looked less fresher and slower than Nadal, starting verry slow and upping his game in the 4th and 5th set where it mattered the most.I would make a wild guess that his juice takes effect as the match progresses while Nadal`s juice works straight from the bathroom for minimum 5 hrs. Althou he keeps sweting he never actually gets tired.
    When both player are on the juice they well focused – think about all the wins of Jokovic since 2001 onwards. Whenever Djoke is not on it – he seems flat like on this FO and US Open.
    It`s a public secret that AO is a favourite GS for dopers because of the less stric testing.
    Here comes the question…why Fed does not dope or put in other words, why he doesn`t leagally dope since its allowed .I mean , even the readers of this blog know what players are tested for and not… :-)
    Whatever he`s taken is not strong enough. Some dope will help him stay longer in rallies, help him with the focus…but unfortunatelly this cannot help his brain melting like jelly when under pressure vs Nadal.
    Btw did you read the news that Fed`s assets manager has signed with Del Potro before they met in the semis?

    [Reply]

  8. Djoker saving the day again indeed. Australia does become very interesting doesn’t it? I still put Djoker as the favourite after what happened this year, how he managed to survive after that Wawrinka match only God knows. I think Djoker this year got ahead of himself after the Monte Carlo win. If he’s going to win the French he’s going to have to take it one step at a time. First goal, winning Australia should be his only priority now. He needs another slam now that Nadal holds two of them.

    Regarding Federer’s relationship with both. I think Fed and Djoker aren’t the best of friends because of things that have happened between the two back when Novak was up and coming. I remember something happened at Davis Cup that Roger wasn’t too pleased with and then in his early years Novak wasn’t a credible athlete with all his injuries and medical timeouts, I remember Roger throwing shade at Djoker a few times for that. Then we have their slam matches. Djokovic always wanted the attention that Fed gets in the stadium. Who can forget that US Open semi 2011, Roger probably still pissed at that, he was being very snarky in the press room after that match even though he was the one to blame for the loss, remember how Djokovic looked at the crowd after he saved the match points? I’m sure Roger won’t forget it. Even Djokovic’s post match celebrations, the fist pumping on the chest, the shirt tearing. Fed well known for condemning those sorts of things. Finally, Novak’s parents. His mother openly stated the king is dead and then the father had some very very rude things to say about Roger this year and I don’t recall a moment when Novak apologised on his behalf?

    The truth is Ru-an, we don’t know what goes on behind closed doors with the players. A lot of players don’t get on with Novak because of his arrogant personality but they all are arrogant to an extent and that’s who they are. IMO I think you’ve got it all wrong. Roger doesn’t respect Nadal enough. If he accepted Rafa’s threat on his records earlier, he wouldn’t have been stubborn and changed his approach. He believes Nadal is the anti-tennis and thinks that this guy wasn’t good enough to make him change. Now look what has happened? Rafa has obtained a mental hold on Roger that has cost him a lot and unfortunately could even cost him his slam record now that Nadal is slowly creeping up. Djokovic has saved Roger’s ass many times but Roger has also stopped Djoker doing many things as well. This is how tennis is. I don’t think Djokovic or Nadal should be the focus for Fed now. As you said fitness is key ahead of Australia. He needs to start making QF again for starters. He is going to get a top 4 in his quarter so that’s all we can hope for right now. Once he gets his consistency back and starts winning the big matches and titles, then we can start worrying about Djokodal.

    [Reply]

    Ru-an Reply:

    Good comment Fedfan. I can see why you say he doesn’t respect Nadal enough. I think he either respects him too much or not enough. As for Nadal and Djokovic I was talking more about the past and for when Roger gains confidence again. He is clearly not yet on the level to bother them yet.

    [Reply]

    Katyani Reply:

    Hey Fedfan, great comment. You know what the problem is with Novak (and his dad)? They expected that the respect and love and admiration the crowd all over the world has for Roger WOULD COME ALONG with the world number one ranking. That is why his dad lashed out on Roger with a remark dated back to 2007. It has been 3 years since Novak is nr 1, Roger is top 7, STILL Roger gets much more admiration from the crowd and Novak does not. That bothers them both. That is why Novak was so angry at the crowd in Miami??? when the crowd was more for Dimitrov. But what they don’t see or get is that Roger did not get that admiration because he was nr 1. He got it because of who he was and is. And what Novak and his dad don’t seem to get at all is that “you don’t get respect, you EARN respect”. Even at the final, except for the Serbian people, the crowd was more for Rafa.

    [Reply]

  9. Hi Ru-an, It was a wonderful evening’s tennis that was made even better by the dismantling of Nadal. This time, I was closer to the action and am able to share two videos at different stages in the match. The first one is in the middle of the second set when Djokovic already has the break and Nadal is fighting to hold. The Second one is Djokovic closing it out.

    Surface:
    Slow as expected but definitely faster than say, Indian Wells that was like quicksand when I saw some action there in 2008. Bounce – not too high from what I saw. It took all of Nadal’s strength – of muscle and grunt – to get one forehand to rear high to Djokovic’s shoulder whereas on other surfaces, those 3000 RPMs would explode and spit with no mercy. Flat shots were very effective and skiddy. Djokovic’s backhand in that context did a lot of damage.

    Nadal’s game:
    Inconsistent. He went down 0-3 in the first set due to poor serving. This was very uncharacteristic and a huge surprise and it immediately placed him under pressure very early on. We’re talking about Nadal double faulting twice or more during the course of the match. The poor serving against the best returner had him often on the backfoot. This allowed djokovic to control the rallies and attack more. Forehand was missing its mark. As expected, hardly any net game but plently of forehand whips from behind the baseline. Backhand was used more as a scramble-retrieve tool. Service returns were not good enough to set up winning positions.

    Djokovic’s game:
    Outstanding. Very calm and very clutch throughout in closing out both sets due to a superb execution of different serves in varying speeds. Excellent depth in groundstrokes and the flatter shots that skimmed off the surface had Nadal scrambling. This was the first time at a venue where I saw the best two-handed backhand in the game counter the Nadal forehand. And it was a fantastic sight! That forehand is rendered as obsolete against the Djokovic BH as Roger’s BH is to Nadal’s FH. I hope the videos will show this from a different angle than what’s shown on TV.

    The only hope Nadal had of winning this match on this surface was to have a good serve %age and to attack the net more (which he will never do in this life, but might have to consider especially in future encounters with Djokovic and to keep a favourable H2H).

    Sorry to ramble, Ru-an, but i thought before closing I’d add that when I saw Djokovic dealing with Nadal, my mind went back to what Roger was missing and the one thing that hit me repeatedly was – Patience.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZCnxnBndnkg
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3bZLyAgtd7o

    [Reply]

    Ru-an Reply:

    Cool Grumpy. Thanks for the info.

    [Reply]

    rich Reply:

    Good comments, Grumpy. Ruan gives us expert analysis but it isn’t often we can also have a man court-side. The best of both worlds. A fun read.

    [Reply]

    Grumpy Reply:

    Thank you Rich. This match convinced me even more that ever that if Roger had displayed more consistency in holding serve, the finals would have been his to lose. Not sure if he could have gone past Djokovic, but Nadal, with certainty, I can say yes. Anyway, it’s all over and I’m happy to add to Ru-an’s analysis as an observer. He does distil our collective thoughts into his own takes quite well so there’s not much I can add.

    [Reply]

  10. Different styles of play bring the most excitement to the game. This is confirmed by the constant beating of Nadal from Fedfans. If Nadal played much like Federer does then expectation would decrease because it’s the battle of opposites styles that make people react strongly. This blog is the perfect example of what I’m talking about.

    [Reply]

    Ru-an Reply:

    Right. Hating Nadal is exciting. Not in an evil kind of way. Just because it’s fun.

    [Reply]

    rich Reply:

    Nice one, Ruan. The joys of hating. I like it! Actually, there is another good reason for detesting Nadal, and it has nothing to do with his playing style – as much as that is fun to hate. The other reason is steroids. Nadal would have no game without it. He would be a moderately successful clay grinder but without a slam title – much as he showed at the end of 2009, when basically all the top players could kick his then skinny little butt.

    [Reply]

    Ru-an Reply:

    Well that part I still can’t be 100% sure about, even though I have my suspicions. I just don’t like the guy and he is fun to hate. Nothing is more satisfying than seeing him lose, especially when he gets owned like he has been all indoor season long. There is just something very special about it.

    [Reply]

    rich Reply:

    It’s not just indoors – he’s been owned since the USO – like he is every year. Beijing and Shanghai are outdoor tournaments. He got destroyed firstly by Djoko and then Del Potro. Indoors – he scarcely showed up. Mr Tireless had to take another break because of “fatigue”. Not as brave as he is during the clay season, is he?

    [Reply]

    Ru-an Reply:

    When I talk about the indoor season I mean post USO. The indoor season is so short these days it’s hardly worth mentioning on its own.

    [Reply]

    rich Reply:

    Since we know he can win titles on hard-court earlier in the year his post-USO decline every year looks an awful lot like a cycle, doesn’t it?

    [Reply]

    Ru-an Reply:

    Well lets face it he puts a lot of effort into the clay season and he also had a pretty taxing year. I’m not sure we can say there is a cycle because he is usually pretty tired by the end of the season and he just isn’t a very good indoor player.

    [Reply]

    rich Reply:

    No other top player in the history of the game that I can recall used to routinely fade after Wimbledon or the USO every year. Gustavo Kuerten put a lot of effort into the clay season. He made it to No.1 in 2000 by beating Sampras – wait for it – indoors, in the year end Masters finals. No sign of fatigue there. Jesus, Nadal didn’t even start this year until the clay season! How can he be tired!

    [Reply]

    rich Reply:

    Also, we might note that – unlike Nadal – Djoko has played the full year. He put a lot of effort into the clay season as well, beating Nadal in Monte Carlo. He’s won just about everything since the USO. Is he tired? I just don’t buy that b/s from Nadal.

    [Reply]

    Ru-an Reply:

    Well Nadal has hardly lost a match all year so he actually played an awful lot. He only missed Australia. And no matter what you say he is not a good indoor player.

    [Reply]

    rich Reply:

    You are right that he is not a good indoor player. But I think that also has something to do with his cycle. He loses power in his game later in the year. Hawkeye showed that in Beijing his av ground-stroke speed had fallen. Also I don’t want to be pedantic, but he missed more than the AO – his first tournament this year (which he lost in the final) was a S American clay-court tournament just before Monte Carlo, so he didn’t play the hard-court series of tournaments like Dubai, Rotterdam, and then Indian Wells and Miami. That’s why it’s ridiculous that he starts his year 3 months in and makes it to No.1 within 6 months from being ranked no.4 after coming off a 7 month injury break. I have a contact on the pro tour who tells me a lot of pro’s (especially the top doubles players, who I can’t name) think this could only be done by a doper.

    [Reply]

    Ru-an Reply:

    Well he played 3 clay court events in South America. I don’t know what is normal schedule is but I think he usually plays Dubai and not Rotterdam. Then he played Indian Wells as well before another brutal clay court season. He made the final of every event he played or better until Beijing, other than Wimbledon where he lost 2nd round. No wonder he had less power in Beijing.

    [Reply]

    rich Reply:

    But, Ruan, this is the guy who never tires! It’s always his opponent who is worn out. Djokovic has played the full year – and he defends as strenuously as Nadal does; why isn’t he worn out after the USO – every year? I think you are playing devil’s advocate with me! Surely you don’t buy that fatigue argument from the Nadal camp!

    [Reply]

    Ru-an Reply:

    I just don’t see any definitive proof for the ‘cycling’ you talk about. Not saying it’s not possible, but truth is Nadal is not a great indoor player, and I just don’t think he puts as much emphasis on that part of the season as the clay season for instance. It is just natural to put the most effort into what you are best at. Just like Roger is putting less effort into the clay season these days and peaks for the indoor season.

    [Reply]

    rich Reply:

    No. I am not offering it as definitive proof. But it fits.

    [Reply]

    rich Reply:

    By the way, I don’t expect you or anyone else to be as convinced of these things as I am; I am just quite happy to debate it – and I’m grateful that you don’t try to close the debate down. You take a pretty broad view of these things.

    [Reply]

  11. Great article Ru-an. For me (and I think for many of us) it is: The person I want to win the most titles:
    1) Roger
    2) Anyone BUT Rafa.
    I get so annoyed when they start making Olympic Singles Gold and Davis Cup more important than it should be. Seriously, it only became important when someone woke up and realised, hey Rafa has got them and Roger doesn’t, lets make a too big deal out of it. First of all Rafa did not win the DC, Spain did. I understand he did not even play all the matches and is it not true that Roger (although he did not win DC) played more DC matches than the others?
    Second, why doesn’t Roger scream from the rooftop, hey Rafa, you may have Olympic Gold, but guess what, so do I. So what if it is in doubles. Didn’t Roger and Stan beat the greatest doubles team ever (Bryan Brothers) to get Gold???
    Ps: Ru-an, I haven’t read the comments above yet, but I guess you will hear from some Rafa fans soon who will say that you are too mean on Rafa and that all Roger fans talk like this !!!
    But don’t worry, you wrote the truth.

    And… I have a feeling Roger will practise this 1,5 month with a bigger racquet…

    [Reply]

    rahan Reply:

    I agree with all you wrote

    [Reply]

  12. You can hate till you bleed but that does not change reality. Nadal vs all other number ones of his generation: Agassi 2-0, Safin 2-0, Ferrero 7-2, Federer 22-10, Djokovic 22-17, Moyá 6-2, Hewitt 6-4, Roddick 7-3. 66% victories. It’s easy to say that he dopes, that the titles do not count, that the style is ugly and how much fun it is to loathe him, etc but he’s proved he kicked the ass of all other champions of his era. Who do you think is laughing the most?

    [Reply]

    Ru-an Reply:

    Why would I bleed? I thought I just said it was fun…

    [Reply]

    rich Reply:

    Who do we think is laughing the most?

    Let’s see – for a start there’s Robin Soderling, Lukas Rosol, Steve Darcis …

    [Reply]

    Joakim Reply:

    Robin Soderling beat an injured Nadal at RG 2009. Rafa missed Queens and Wimbledon, he could hardly go on playing in pain. But Soderling was crushed in their next encounters in 2010 and 2011. Look at the archives and check the players Federer has lost to. You won’t have to look too far back. Like any other player in history. That argument lacks in every way.

    [Reply]

    rahan Reply:

    Joakim – You are right:
    I also like Rafa style and I really cannot understand how somebody dislike it. One recent example:
    3 winners in a 40 minute first set againts Djoko.

    [Reply]

    Ru-an Reply:

    Lol.

    [Reply]

    V Reply:

    Well its pretty pointless feeding a person whose mouth is closed.
    No point in arguing with a person who has no intentions of changing his stance and one who has a ready reply even before the question is put forth.Don;t waste your time guys.
    Ruan will make a special post for topics like that lol

    [Reply]

  13. When has Nadal ever done well in indoor hards.
    Hell its only this year that he did well on outdoor hards.

    Nadal will probably take AO 14 with RG NID anyway.

    Wimby is lottery but if he reaches Semis (by that time grass slows down to clay) , its anyones call

    USO – he may or may not have juice left by then but I wont rule it out.

    WTFs etc – he should t care because indoors is not real tennis anyway.

    [Reply]

    Ru-an Reply:

    You mean clay is not real tennis.

    [Reply]

  14. No , Indoor tennis is like Badminton.
    Tennis should have elements involved (Wind , Light etc)

    I mean its ok for amateurs who play and learn in clubs etc but at pro level outdoor surface should be a must.

    I dont like clay either but it is at least tennis.

    [Reply]

    Ru-an Reply:

    Indoor tennis is the most pure form of tennis. No elements involved to spoil it. Tennis at its best. Clay has its place but there is a lot of pushing and grinding going on which is rubbish tennis.

    [Reply]

    rich Reply:

    If this clown thinks it is the elements that make for real tennis then the best tennis should be played in howling winds, near darkness and maybe some rain as well. Pure ball-striking is beyond his comprehension.

    [Reply]

    Ru-an Reply:

    Lol. He must have enjoyed the final part of the 2008 Wimby final…

    [Reply]

    Grumpy Reply:

    As a regular spectator, I can say that averse weather conditions do not make it a pleasure for good tennis viewing. While it is a joy to watch outdoor tennis in great sunny conditions and little or no wind/rain, for tennis players, nothing beats the setting of an indoor court.

    [Reply]

  15. I see you know the truth about what is real tennis. Wow! Wimbledon and Roland Garros exist since 1877 and 1891 and Jesus, we now discover it’s not real tennis. Let’s inform the ATP! All slam are played outdoors, what a terrible mistake!!!

    [Reply]

    Ru-an Reply:

    Why so excited? I only said clay isn’t tennis in response to the poster saying indoors isn’t real tennis. It is obvious that both are tennis. If you read my second reply to him you would have seen I gave clay court tennis a place. If you are here to troll you may as well get lost now before I ban you.

    [Reply]

    rich Reply:

    Joakim whoever, if indoor tennis isn’t real tennis it’s strange why the year-ending finals amongst the top 8 players have long been played indoors. And winning the championship has always mattered a lot to the players. It even matters to your dubious hero, Nadal, who has a huge hole in his resume, never having won it. That of course is the reason you discount indoors – Nadal can’t win the WTF. And the only reason you come to a Federer fan site is to defend the dopeballer. You certainly don’t come here to demonstrate a knowledge of the game.

    [Reply]

    Joakim Reply:

    Trolls abound here, insults coming from the Fed side are accepted and respectful comments not in line with the Federer myth are frowned upon. Regarding the fact that Nadal hasn’t won the WTF yet, it’s not worrying at all. He has plenty of time to do that and I’m pretty sure he’ll make it one day. Should he not win it, it’s no big deal. He has enough big tournaments and has proved better than the rest. No player wins everything and breaks all records.

    [Reply]

  16. Clay-court tennis separates children from men. You have to show character and you must fight for every point and not rely on the serve so much. Your mentality is tested, as is your will to win in hard long matches. If you believe tennis is not about fighting, tell me about a player who has succeded that never put a lot of work in it. Rod Laver, Nastase, Vilas, Borg, Wilander, Lendl, etc. won the tournament amongst others, some of the best ever, and they proudly have a place in the history of the sport because of it. When Federer won RG (we know it was because Rafa was not playing in front of him that Sunday afternoon) he was filled with joy. Ask him if he would rather have a couple more RG in his bag and less Masters Cups.

    [Reply]

    Ru-an Reply:

    Also, respond to someone if you are talking to anyone. Don’t just make a comment and no one knows who you are talking to.

    [Reply]

    rich Reply:

    I am sure Nadal would give up a RG title or two for a Masters Cup. But it will never happen. Not good enough. Wrong part of his cycle.

    [Reply]

  17. Ilie “Nasty” Năstase – a good example indeed ! He is well known for his professionalism and hard work
    between two tennis matches:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ilie_N%C4%83stase#Personal_life

    [Reply]

    Chris Reply:

    Sounds like hard work to me! He must have been ‘working out’ on many different surfaces as well… :-)

    [Reply]

    Joakim Reply:

    Sex rules the world. You obviously ignore its benefits. Usain Bolt, Ronaldo and other sportsmen have taken it in their advantage. Those stories about sleeping with thousands of women are all false, though. But sex is like a rush of blood to your brain, it lifts you up!!!

    [Reply]

    rich Reply:

    The only thing noticeable about your comments is the rush of blood to the brain. In your case, now we know why. You have come to the wrong part of the internet.

    [Reply]

    Joakim Reply:

    Hahaha, as obssessive as you are about your hero and then puritanism appears in your speech. Oh dear.

    [Reply]

    rich Reply:

    Well, we know where the mind of a Nadal fan is centred. Not surprising, since he is an obsessive butt-scratcher.

    [Reply]

    Chris Reply:

    Why do you think I ignore its benefits? It’s the one form of doping I fully approve!

    [Reply]

  18. It’s been so long I actually forgot how much fun it is to watch fast court tennis. Isn’t this better for the audience and for TV? Why wouldn’t the ATP want at least some tournaments to still be played like this? Who wants to watch 2 guys have a war of attrition for 6 hours????????

    [Reply]

    rich Reply:

    I used to enjoy watching tennis once! On grass we saw the best serve and volley game, hard-court had explosive rallies, and clay was almost like chess on a tennis court (before Nadal got hold of it.) The significant variation in surfaces permitted this, and players of very different styles. But no longer. In the WTF finals I watched Djokovic and Nadal sliding around a considerably slowed court as though they were playing a hard-court version of RG. Defense trumps everything now. Frankly, the only real variation I have seen in the men’s game in the last decade has come from Roger. He is truly a throwback to the past; a beautiful elegant reminder of how all-court tennis was played by the greats from Laver onwards. If you saw him in his prime you were privileged – because the game has changed and his like will not come again soon.

    [Reply]

  19. Hi Ru-an, lots of action on your blog….it’s stirring up lots of emotions. Just want to comment plus thank you for the video of Sampras/Becker beautiful tennis display, it brings back wonderful memories. Truly is a joy to watch these two great tennis players play real tennis. Sampras was my favorite before Roger came along. But the real beauty was the way tennis was played years ago. Agassi was another one of my favorite, although he was a bit of a rebel compared to Pete.
    Best,
    Dolores

    [Reply]

    Ru-an Reply:

    Sampras was my favorite and then I got tired of his dominance and I started rooting for the underdog Agassi. I also remember the time of the big servers and fast surfaces which was boring. Ace after ace and many serve-and-volley players. Agassi provided something different as he was a base liner. I’m gad those days are over but things have gone to the other extreme now. I enjoy Nadal/Djokovic matches a lot more than the boring big servers as long as Djokovic wins a fair amount. I think they should find a happy medium though. There seems to be no help for player who take the initiative and plays attacking tennis like Roger does. That is not good either.

    [Reply]

  20. Hey Ru-an, what are your thoughts about Roger possibly hiring Gasquet’s old coach??? Really want to know what you think about it…

    [Reply]

    Ru-an Reply:

    Well we don’t know if he is going to do it. Right now it’s just a rumor. Me and you have talked about this before. I don’t know if Fed listens to his coaches so I don’t know if he needs one.

    [Reply]

    Katyani Reply:

    Yes, the guy is stubborn, but that is what I love about him… I heard today that Roger will not be playing Rotterdam next year. Too bad. Does not matter. I just have to wait for him another year. Always look for the positive !!!

    [Reply]

    Ru-an Reply:

    Yeah that would be a shame if he doesn’t play Rotterdam Katyani. One of the few indoor events around these days and he needs to take advantage of all of them.

    [Reply]

  21. I read on a french blog that Ricardo Piatti is gonna be coaching Milos Raonic and not Roger Federer, Katyani.

    [Reply]

    Katyani Reply:

    Oh oke, I thought Roanic did a great job with his former coach. He has improved a lot this year. But hey, they all change coaches.

    [Reply]

    Wilfried Reply:

    Hi Katyani,
    Raonic’s coach doesn’t go.
    I think Piatti is probably going to work together with Ivan Ljubicic in coaching him, see link below(article in French):
    http://fr.sports.yahoo.com/blogs/jeu-decisif/gasquet-piatti-dessous-d-séparation-210140037.html

    [Reply]

  22. Hi Ruan,
    Just wanted to let you know that I still enjoy reading your posts as much as I did enjoy reading them when I first got to know your site. Your blog will soon exist 5 years now, reason to thank you sincerely for keep putting all the hard work in all those posts and comments, and not giving up when you see readers come and go. I admire you for that.
    I can’t comment unfortunately myself as often as I used to, but keep reading your blog almost daily.
    Wish you the best in all.

    [Reply]

    Ru-an Reply:

    Thanks Wilfried and I’m glad you stuck around. I wonder what happened to Veronica. I’ll make a 5-year anniversary post in December probably.

    [Reply]

    Wilfried Reply:

    Yeah, I miss her comments too and wonder where she ‘s lost at the moment. Must have to do with her private life I guess.

    [Reply]

    Ru-an Reply:

    She has always taken long breaks from my blog but never this long. It’s like you say it can be anything. I might send her another email. Last time I sent her one she was on a European trip. She is surely done with that by now so I dunno. But yeah she is missed. I think it could be one of the reasons I have had less comments of late too. She kind of takes an interest in everyone and gets everyone involved. Or maybe it’s cause Fed has struggled of late. Hopefully that is not the case though.

    [Reply]

    Chris Reply:

    Yep, she’s missed. Don’t worry about getting fewer comments, you have your core group of readers, but sometimes our private / work lives keep us away from commenting…

    [Reply]

    Ru-an Reply:

    Well she is part of the core group which is why I care. People come and go all the time but there are a few of you who have always stayed, and who I value the most as readers. Nice to know that you guys are still there though and the reason you don’t always comment.

    [Reply]

  23. Hi Ru-an!

    I’m from India. I’ve been reading your blog posts for a year now, and I share many of your views! You should be proud of yourself as you have turned me towards writing! I’ve started my own blog on Federer recently, though its nowhere as good as yours.

    Thank you, and keep writing!

    [Reply]

    Ru-an Reply:

    I’m glad I inspired you to write Akshay. I checked you blog out and it looks good. I also tweeted your blog to my followers and followed you on twitter. Good luck!

    [Reply]

    Akshay Kumar Reply:

    Thanks Ru-an! I promise to be much more active on your posts as well. I always wanted to comment, but I never had the time. Now I’ve got a lot of time, and I think it’ll be nice. I’m thinking of doing a sort-of ‘season review’ for Federer, tournament-by-tournament – I’ll keep you posted!

    [Reply]

    Ru-an Reply:

    Cool. I’ll probably do something similar at some point.

    [Reply]

  24. This may be of interest to some of you:

    http://www.tennis.com/pro-game/2013/11/gods-and-humans/49792/#.UofdkSfYEmA

    [Reply]

    Ru-an Reply:

    Nice article Jiten. I’m glad Roger did not retire after 2012. I mean he was only 31. Too early to retire.

    [Reply]

    Jiten Reply:

    Thanks Ru-an. Probably you are aware that Tendulkar was conferred the highest civilian award in India by the President of India yesterday. What better one can wish for on his last day with the national team?

    [Reply]

  25. Ru-an
    In the first sentence of your final paragraph you pose the question: “Why does he (Federer) respect Nadal so much?”
    Unfortunately, you didn’t follow up with the obvious answer. It’s too bad because I think it’s a worthwhile question for you (and the rest of the Nadal haters) to ponder.

    A lot of posters above have attacked Nadal’s character with claims that he’s a “phony” “not real” “faking humility” “a doper” “disingenuous”, “arrogant”, and “disrespectful”.

    To those making above allegations, I pose this question to you:
    Why would Roger Federer have so much respect for a guy who is arrogant, who is a phony, and who fakes humility? Why would he become good friends with a guy he suspects of doping, especially when that guy he thinks is cheating is the same guy defeating him in the finals of so many Majors? And why would Federer befriend a guy who is disrespectful and disingenuous?

    Roger Federer has probably spent more time with Rafa Nadal (outside of Rafa’s family and coaches) than anyone else on this planet over the last 8 years. If anyone can speak with knowledge on Rafa Nadal’s character, it’s Roger Federer.

    So back to Ru-An’s question:
    “why does Federer respect Nadal so much”
    It’s a simple answer folks.

    [Reply]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *